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How To Be An Office Hero: 3 Myths, Busted
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 7:15:40 PM
Re: Inexpensive perk
@Bhori: Monthly reviews or some kind of ongoing feedback process would be incredibly helpful. Most annual review processes are time consuming and onerous for all involved and, except in cases of truly egregrious performance, rarely do they have any noticeable affect. Even without a formal process, it's smart for managers to make it a practice to give their team members continual feedback -- it's far more constructive to hear something in the moment than six or 12 months after it happened.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 1:49:05 PM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
@SaneIT- True, if you are WAAAAY over or under a promise, you lose credibility. But i suspect if you say 6 months and constantly due it in 5 months and 3 weeks, you'll be appreciated. To me, that's basicaly in the realm of keeping the promise. You were on time. If you make it in 2 months they'll be like, "so what was the extra time for? What di they skip?"
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 1:46:44 PM
Re: Better
@tzubair- The studies are showing you are better off promising more then and delivering what you promise. The excess of what you promised is seldom noticed or appreciated.
D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 1:44:30 PM
What people think of you...
I can honestly say that I don't think anyone can truly assess what others really think of them in any real situation. In the office, I've found a mix of integrity and compatibility coupled with reliability have been the best personality traits that offer others enough respect for you. But in the end, do we really know what other's think of us? I think not. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 1:39:31 PM
Re: Some goals are tricky
@pcharles09- I suspect all the over delivering gets noticed by the right manager. But i don't think it is in the way we think. I don't think it has to do with doing a better job. I think at has to do with the manager thinking, "I need this done. Who can i ask?" If you are constantly the one the manager knows they can ask, you're doing great. That can be done simply by meeting promises as well.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 7:36:25 AM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
My opinion on estimating project time is that if you're close then most people won't care if you go over a bit as long as you can identify why you went over.  If you say "we can get this done today" but something comes up and it is pushed off until the next day people understand and appreciate that you are busy.  If you say "we can do this in 6 months" and it takes an extra week people will understand.  If you say "this will take 6 months" and you get it done in 2 people stop listening to your estimates.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 6:20:12 AM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
@Lorna: I think this psychological factor often works. Rather than setting your own internal deadline to be ahead of the actual deadline, most people are more comfortable with an external pressure that can make them be more discipilined. I think I myself would also fall in that category.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 6:08:42 AM
Re: Better
"Rather than under-promising and over-delivering, probably better to under-promise, keep the promise, and then make new, better promises for the easy excess."

@Joe: When you're in a situation where you're competing with a lot of others who're as qualified and skillfull as you are, you're often forced to deliver more than what you promise. If you simply keep up with what you promised, you're at par with others. But if you really want to stand out and exceed others, you have to do more. At least I was often faced with this situation during my career a lot of times.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 11:16:12 PM
Better
It's also worth pointing out that "better" is a relative concept.  Row 10, for instance, may be my ideal -- close enough to see well but not so close that it's too loud for me or I have to strain my neck to look up at the stage.

Rather than under-promising and over-delivering, probably better to under-promise, keep the promise, and then make new, better promises for the easy excess.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 10:45:54 PM
Re: Some goals are tricky
@David,

The real question is, with all those years of over delivering, do you feel like its been noticed?
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