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Stop Recruiting, Start Connecting
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tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 4:15:21 AM
Re: Hidden gems
"No matter how advanced our technology is becoming the mounting entropy of "hiring processes" is mind numbing."

@Jack: I think one of the reasons behind this might be the fact that there's not a lot of people out there who understand both HR and technology. There are HR experts and then there are technology experts. The combination of both of these is a great area but you don't seem to find a lot of professionals who qualify for this. This may be the reason why technology companies don't have a very sound hiring process.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 4:04:24 AM
Re: Hidden gems
"I think IT loses too many "imperfect" candidates during a recruitment screen by non IT-people.  Who better than your peers to gauge your passion for learning?"

@Laurianne: I totally agree with you on this. However, the last time I talked about this with the HR head in my company, he argued that IT people have a very myopic view about assessing people. They'd only focus on the technical part and not on the overall personality. Plus, he argued, that the IT people might not be aware of the strategy of the company and won't be able to find a sync between the people and the company strategy.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 3:57:26 AM
Candid conversations
In my experience, the best way to hire someone (and be hired for that matter) has been through candid conversations with the people working there. Talking about stuff the company does and the projects the candidate has done along with finding common links between the two has always been very effective for me. It usually gets the candidate to speak up more openly and not just speak to impress. On the recruiter's side, it helps the candidate know more clearly about the culture and the working environment rather than a rosy picture painted by the HR.
Jack Perkins
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Jack Perkins,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2014 | 4:43:35 PM
Re: Hidden gems
Thank you Laurianne - allowing smart people to matriculate a bit should be a primary strategy for companies falling behind in their software engineer hiring.  Even the mighty Google falls short in this department. For example: Recently a particle physicist I know (Ph.D. High Energy Physics) who just finished his post doc at Stanford. In the course of his research he had to code C++ and do Machine Learning. He was referred by Google employees who know him(other physicists) to interview at Google.  First step: one hour with a Google recruiter who read from a list of questions. Second step: Phone "screen" from a software engineer on the team.  Conclusion: not enough computer science fundamentals.

If they looked at his resume they could have plainly seen this.

He was looking for an entry level job and he was an employee referral to boot!

But the "process" trumps all logic.

No matter how advanced our technology is becoming the mounting entropy of "hiring processes" is mind numbing.

Jack

 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 3:58:43 PM
Hidden gems
Jack, thought-provoking piece, thanks for sharing it. I think IT loses too many "imperfect" candidates during a recruitment screen by non IT-people.  Who better than your peers to gauge your passion for learning? Smart companies are training data analysis pros on the spot right now, for example. They are learning by doing.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 1:26:28 PM
Let peers talk
"Employers that keep trying to fill reqs like they're 20th century assembly line jobs will fall behind companies adept at peer-to-peer communication."

Well said. Recruiters and HR reps are still necessary of course but the hiring process at most companies has become so rigid and formal. Couldn't agree more with this article's call for more informal dialogue between peers as part of that process.
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