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Doctors Can Go Back To Tech School
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/26/2014 | 7:31:15 PM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
@JasonS441: Fair enough. Are you a doctor or medical professional?

If so, I would very much like to know more about the challenges you're facing in dealing with changing technology and regulatory environments. We're all here to learn.
JasonS441
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JasonS441,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/23/2014 | 9:39:57 AM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
I am so sick of non-doctors who think they have the right to tell doctors how they should work or what they should do.  You dont know anything about medicine.

 

 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
8/5/2014 | 4:36:27 AM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
Gary, 

My point is that the minimum all doctors should be using now are iPads, Glass, EHRs, and some AI to assist those who are surgeons. When you talk with some doctors they don't even want to spend time learning about how to efficiently use EHRs and ePrescriptions. 

Robots assisting surgeons and also through telemedicine already exist today. There are also robots that visit patients which count with a screen through which the physicians communicate with those patients. 

Doctors today can't limit their knowledge to just medicine and believe that technology is just for the IT people. That was in the past. They need to learn about the technology available to assist their practice and incorportate it as soon as possible.

Another thing, iPads may be used by everyone, but doctors need to learn to use the specific applications for their practice. Glass is perfect for surgeons and for med students. 

-Susan  
cschooler
IW Pick
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cschooler,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/4/2014 | 1:40:08 PM
Two programs, not one...
Is TAMHSC on the right track?  Yes in some regards.  Educating end user docs on the HIT capability road map such as tele-health and mobile will make for a smoother adoption of these technologies over time. 

However, TAMHSC is not on the right track with its two goals: a) teaching end users and b) developing HIT technologists.  Because the target prospective student is completely different for each goal, these goals need to be separated to provide clarity of purpose and reduce confusion.

For example, with end users, the goal is to create better end user docs. The curriculum should focus on the tools they use in their specialty and day-to-day activities.  In this scenario, the goal is to create "drivers" not "mechanics".  An end user needs to know how to operate the capability, be it an EHR, a DICOM system or robotic surgery instrument.  They don't necessarily need to understand the underlying technology such as a relational data base in the case of a (modern) EHR.   The curriculum should include product and capability roadmaps for the functions they may use in the future such tele-health.

For technologists, goal is to create "better" technology. This falls into the age-old tech debate as to who can build a better capability, a tech expert or a end user expert.  As the Human Computer Interface field has shown with its emphasis on end user design methodologies, the optimum path to useful technology is the combination of the two.  The question for this curriculum is: Does this have to be the same person?  How would a design team approach fit into the curriculum?

In addition, a key learning objective for the technology curriculum should be impact of the sea change in the User Interface (UI) paradigm.  A  high percentage of EHR complaints today are based on the fact that first the command line and then the GUI/mouse interface were not equal to the task in a clinical setting no matter how fancy the graphics or how the checkboxes were aligned.  The UI promise of mobile, in addition to being now powerful and cost effective is that it has gesture, video, microphone, an ever increasing number of sensors and is, well mobile.  For the technology curriculum to be on the right track, it has to answer the question: will it produce the innovative people who can take the next generation UI and solve the short comings of the current HIT applications? 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 12:47:32 PM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
Agreed, Susan, but iPads are used by everyone, and Google Glass will be used by everyone. Just by virtue of being part of society, the docs will become fluent with these devices like everyone else. As for robots, those will need to be operated only by specialists, surgeons. They will need to learn how to operate them. But it will be the IT pros alone who will need to build them, sell them and service them. Although yes, the surgeons will have to become involved in specifying them.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 4:29:12 AM
There is a need for more healthcare technology academies
SusanN, 

"Are TAMHSC and Dell on the right track with their healthcare technology academy?"

Yes, they definitely are. More initiatives like this one is what is going to help physicians get into the health technology track, which they need to practice medicine in the 21st century. 

"Is it necessary for a new discipline to emerge that combines clinical know-how with technological skill, a sort of Dr. CIO?"

Maybe not a Dr. CIO, but something close to that. The fact is that a doctor without any technological knowledge who doesn't know how to use simple devices such as an iPad, Google Glass, or a surgical robot to assist them in their medical practice are going to be so behind that either learn quickly and adapt to the changes, or change career. 

"Also, what are your biggest concerns about EHRs and the increasingly tech-dependent state of healthcare?"

I don't have any concerns about EHRs other than thinking that the slow adoption by some physicians is really worrysome. EHRs are not something new. They have been around for many years now. And yet, the discussions around EHRs are always, always, always the same. :/ The good thing is that the state of EHRs adoption in Europe is much higher than in the US, and moving quickly. 

I don't have any concerns about the increasing tech-dependant state of heathcare either. On the contrary. I believe it is simply a logical consequence of today's tech-dependant society. This is not bad. It means advancement. It mean evolution. This requires adaptation, which is always necessary as part of any evolutionary process.   

Good questions, Susan. Do I get a golden star for answering to all the questions? :) Maybe a candy, too? :D

-SusanF
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 2:13:14 AM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
Gary, 

 "IT pros don't do brain surgery, and there is no need for doctors to become computer experts"

There is a need for doctors to learn how to do brain surgery in the 21st century. This means they need to learn how to use technology in the operation room. iPads, Google Glass, and robots are already being used to assist surgeons. It's the surgeon the one who needs to be operating the devices, not the IT pro. 

-Susan
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Strategist
8/3/2014 | 10:37:40 PM
Re: Medical doctors have too much to do as it is
That's an option. I suspect many physicians will spend time learning only the minimum they need to enter patient information to save time.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 5:34:15 PM
Re: Telepresence role
I think doctors have no choice but adapt and try to learn how to use technology in their field better.  There is a strong government push to use technology to improve our health care.  Health workers who do not use their new medical technology can have a negative impact on their patients' lives.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/2/2014 | 7:19:06 PM
Re: Telepresence role
I agree, but I find that most of my doctors have stopped their IT education with email and health portals. I don't know where they will get the time for more technology training with their busy days.
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