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Geekend: Scare Yourself for Health
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PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 10:31:21 AM
scaring yourself vs skin creams
Of all the things for skin treatment, scaring yourself is of the things I would have never thought.  I guess I will try to scare myself more. My skin sometimes gets very dry. Does this mean no more skin creams?  Pharmaceutical companies may not be so happy with these findings 
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 10:45:02 AM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
After going 20 rounds with "tech support" to get my new computer working right, I think I'm done with good, bad or any other stress for the time being....
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 12:49:00 PM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
@jastroff- Well, how is your skin? :)
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 6:14:45 PM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
@jastroff.  I think you have all the stress you need for all your life after contacting tech support.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 11:22:11 AM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
>> I think you have all the stress you need for all your life after contacting tech support.

 

You said it Pedro! 
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
8/8/2014 | 11:59:30 AM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
I'm alergic to cats ... so maybe yoga with a killer clown?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 12:48:27 PM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
@DavidCarr- Oh...what a good idea for a horror movie. Killer Clown at the Yoga Camp. :)
David Wagner
IW Pick
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 12:56:04 PM
Re: scaring yourself vs skin creams
@pedro- Ha! Interesting. I suuspect the cream makers will just respond with new names. Get ready for a whole new line of "Skin Scare Products":

 

Angst

Scare for Men

New and Improved Terror (Now wiith acai berries and rusty nails)

Oil of No Way

Secret for Women (the secret is what we made this with)

Dismembered Body Bars

Real Poo (as opposed to sham poo)
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 2:20:02 PM
Both at once
@Dave: If I attempted Cat Yoga I would accomplish two goals in one. The relaxation of the yoga and the adrenaline surge from fending off my cat, who would surely go into attack mode if I tried any of those poses...I'll let you know how it works out. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 2:43:38 PM
Re: Both at once
@Susan- That's OK. It works with wound healing, too. :)
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 4:32:30 PM
Either way it is scary
You do need a certain amount of sress to perform well. Athletes need it as do public performers. Having said that would some one who is performing in a Broadway show every night have chronic stress? Or a baseball player who plays usually 6 days per week? Certainly the regular working stiffs have stress from their jobs, commutes and then at home. Where does it end? I have to try Yoga!
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
8/8/2014 | 4:50:32 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
@tgjkg- Hrm...I suspect that performers get used to certain types of stress and it isn't stress anymore. For instance, I'm sure the first 5 or 10 projects a softwsare developer does are stressful because they want to keep their job. After a while they get established and cool down. I assume Broadway performers are the same way. 

But it is true that ballplayers breakdown over the course of a season. I assumed it was from the pounding. Though i suppose it might not be. Good question. 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 9:22:47 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
Humans are very good at adapting to stress so yes, as time passes the nerves are reduced, performing becomes less stressful and it takes new stressors to get a rise out of you.  When you see that breakdown in athletes over the course of a season it is typically cumulative injury.  Unfortunately being afraid to run on a bad ankle doesn't heal it between games.  Athletes play through pain because the alternative is not playing and that directly affects their source of income.  Work stress is much the same, we get used to crazy deadlines, bad bosses, loud co-workers and we adjust, but sometimes cumulative injury (not specifically stress) brings an end to a season or career.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 12:08:07 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
There's usually a breaking point, that time when you just cannot deal with a given situation any longer and that's when your body, soul, and mind reach out for alternatives -- perhaps finding another job, ideally, or not so healthily, pouring yourself into a bottle or a nervous breakdown. It's vital to find stress relievers, such as exercise or a hobby, but sometimes the only answer is to remove yourself from the situation as soon as possible. Even planning that exit can relieve stress!
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 7:05:18 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
Yes we do eventually hit breaking points but you don't have to look far to see just how far physically or mentally people can be pushed before they break.  Some people will of course need to de-stress much sooner than others but even those who need more rest will eventually need less rest if they continue a pattern of stress.   It has become something of a badge of honor in the business world to be able to keep going no matter the stress level but I think it shows another weakness, not knowing when to quit.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 11:00:10 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
I totally agree, @SaneIT, about stress sometimes becoming a badge of honor, as if piling on more and more is somehow admirable. The good news appears to be the next generations tout work/life balance as high on their list of good-job attributes, according to several studies i've read over the years. Hope they stick to that resolve as they have families, move up the career ladder, and face the challenges life often contains. 

I recall an ex-colleague of my dad, who was a business executive. The colleague flipped one day, walked out of the job and moved to the south of France to live an existential lifestyle. Sounds great in a way, except he left his kids and wife behind. 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 7:26:17 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
I wonder how the next generation's work/life balance is going to affect the current workforce.  Will we learn to back off or will we just pick up the slack and work ourselves harder to make up for those who want more down time.  

I'm not surprised about that retirement story, I've had days where I was ready to move to a desert and farm dirt.  I couldn't leave my family behind though.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 9:24:05 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
Yes, in my dad's colleague's case he basically snapped, would be my unprofessional diagnosis! I think most of us dream, occasionally at least, of that cottage in the woods, beach hut, or deserted island, free of all noise, chaos and stress. It would probably get really dull though after a few days or weeks!
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 4:50:42 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
It really is sad because stressed out employees are not productive or along term asset. The value of de stressing employees is not recognized in many businesses. In other countries vacations are lengthier and businesses still function and succeed without their employees for up to 5 weeks at a time.

 

The impulse stress described may actually be an overall stress reliever to more intense and long term stress! Who want to try it out on their most stressed coworker!
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 9:22:22 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
Yes, US employees are given fewer vacations than many of their peers across the world -- and many US workers don't even take all the time they're alloted! Of those who do take time off, a large number continue to check-in during their vacations -- reading emails, calling voicemail, and even finishing or starting projects. It's vital to truly disconnect sometimes, though. Most of us are not truly indispensable at work and if we are, then we need to do some successor planning in case of emergency!
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 11:41:50 AM
Re: Either way it is scary
@David: I agree with you about the software developer and other corporate positions. However stress will rear its ugly head if that lot gets too comfortable and the management throws them something outside their comfort zone. With regards to performers and athletes, I think there is a motivating factor for them with regard to stress. Having done both I can tell you that I really liked going out and performing because the stress was rewarded by the audience reaction. And same thing when I played ball. I am highly competitive and the competition and folks in the stand was stressful and motivating at the same time. You get a buzz out of it. I am guessing the bungy jumpers and parachute crowd get it from the dare of fate.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 12:09:00 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
I wonder where adrenaline ends and stress begins, in the case of athletes and performers, and others who do the same thing every day on a big stage?
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 2:33:59 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
From everything I have read regarding performers, the stress does not end. That could explain the reason why there are so many drugs being used. There is probably a balance somewhere when the stress level is positive for a good performance and once that level is exceeded then you go into pure stress which will have a negative affect. Not really sure how to quantify it though as everyone has different tolerance levels.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/18/2014 | 5:01:53 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
Some stress is good. It gets all those hormones flowing so we become more focused, creative, and intelligent (or at least we think we are!). But living in a perpetual state of stress is bad for us in so many ways. I guess it'd be equally bad to be sad all the time or even happy all day, every day. If we don't undergo peaks and valleys, we don't appreciate the good times and things.
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
9/15/2014 | 1:01:23 PM
Re: Either way it is scary
That is true. It seems like that it is easy to live in constant stress these days with all our electronic gadgets taking up so much of our attention. It allows us to be chained to work at all times, to Facebook, to receive breaking news within moments of the event and track our whereabouts. When I was a child all we had to know was how to "Duck & Cover". That seems a lot less stressful than what goes on today.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 7:00:39 PM
Re: Scare Yourself for Health
At first I was like 'what is Dave doing linking cheesy home-made movies on the Geekend?', but I have to admit, the eyeball in the mail slot got me pretty good. I don't know about clammy skin and adrenaline - maybe I've seen too much on the internet already. That raises a legitimate question about how stress differs for our generations compared to previous ones, doesn't it? The stereotype of the old lady fainting at an inappropriate comment (that's stress, right?)... well, compared to us, she has no idea what 'inappropriate' is. Do we have a higher threshhold for that kind of stress? Maybe that has a little something (just a little) to do with all these chronic health problems.

On a serious note, I'd definitely consider myself in the 'I'll believe it when I see it' camp. We don't know if this will bear any real fruit yet. Some people say our bodies are best at regulating themselves, and others says that's poppycock... I guess it usually turns out the truth is somewhere in the middle. Maybe this will lead to some drugs or what-have-you that kickstart a more natural healing process... or maybe it will just end up as a gimmick in the next horror game from Red Barrels (not that I'd complain). Anyway, this was a fun topic - can't wait for next week!


kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 3:31:25 PM
Sometimes life is one big acute scary moment
Oh please no scary clowns! I have enough acute scary moments in traffic and watching as my kids bounce themselves off random surfaces. I still need to work on countering the chronic stress bit. It seems we are living in a general state of 'gotta do' or 'should do' with to do lists that should take a week that we somehow expect to get done in a day. One of the best things I did to let go of some chronic stress was to learn to politely say no to time eaters that other people wanted me to do for them (usually on short notice when the stress got to them).


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