Comments
IT Jobs: Which States Show Most Growth?
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Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
8/8/2014 | 2:49:35 PM
states
I may have to move my family to Texas. Nice in winter, but the summers can be tough. 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
8/9/2014 | 6:05:55 PM
Re: states
I heard that Austin in particular is a great place to find a job.

But yes, I don't think that I would be able to survie a summer of Texas heat. There are very mild winters there, but you cannot escape the sun during summertime. 
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
8/9/2014 | 8:09:12 PM
Re: states
Yes, it is good to also see the not for profit sector adapting to technology and IT resources. Areas like disaster preparedness do well with leveraging community resources such as social media, websites, mobile and more. It definitely adds to strengthening the cities.
GearyS720
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GearyS720,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/10/2014 | 5:46:41 AM
Re: states
The summers are getting milder every year, and Austin is simply amazing. I work here at HP, and we are always hiring. Not to mention Dell, Apple, HostGator, and the list goes on. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
8/10/2014 | 7:28:23 PM
Re: states
@GeartS729 Texas is looking better and better. It is really something to consider.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2014 | 8:26:42 PM
Re: states

@GearyS720    Thanks for the insight on Texas.    I am like most - thinking it is too hot and ( to be honest) I am not so sure I can deal with the political aspects of living in Texas.   But from a tech perspective the state of Texas is surely something to seriously consider.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2014 | 8:27:44 PM
Re: states

@GearyS720     Isn't Austin just a party town for college kids ?

TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 1:15:49 PM
Re: states
Dell is headquarted in Round Rock, a suburb of Austin. IBM has huge presence there, as does HP. Univ of Texas is no longer the only game in town.

But you people are missing a big item if considering moving to Texas: You better love traffic. Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, Austin and San Antonio are all an adventure. And I'm talking just trying to get somewhere on Interstates.

But that said, Austin is one of my favorite cities in country. Long live 6th street, the home of the late Stevie Ray Vaughn.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 5:34:15 PM
Re: states

@TerryB    Thanks for the insight.   I am in L.A. now so I guess I would be use to the traffic.   And for the record I have nothing against partying or Stevie Ray Vaugh.   I will have to go on a road trip and check things out.

KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
User Rank: Moderator
8/13/2014 | 7:17:16 PM
Re: states
I think the cost-of-living difference between some of the states on the list (no state income tax in Texas and Florida, for example, as someone else noted previously here) and the Bay Area or NYC is a big lure for some people, and it should be part of the recruiting pitch for IT employers when applicable. As someone who relocated to North Carolina after living in Los Angeles and San Francisco, I can attest: the price difference, especially for housing, is a big as advertised.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 10:01:52 PM
Re: states

@Kevin   Thank you for your insight.   As an engineer who is seriously contemplating a "change of scene"  the advice along this thread has been invaluable.    

I think I have a couple of road trips to make, but this discussion has been really helpful in considering all of the aspects ( or at least most of the important ones) with regard to relocation to "hot tech areas".  

No Income tax ?   I forgot about that - and that is a major consideration to be sure. Many elements to consider and thanks again for bring them up. 

Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/14/2014 | 10:03:23 AM
Re: states
Lack of a personal income tax in Florida is a big benefit -- like getting a raise, even if your salary remains the same when you relocate. In Brevard and Orange Counties, Florida, we're seeing a lot of companies open or expand offices, and pay salaries similar to those in the northeast or west. Despite the lower cost of living and lack of tax, businesses like Harris, Embrauer, and others recognize they must pay competitively for their industry in order to attract talented engineers and technologists. Simply having a high salary comparative to Florida doesn't work for many of these professionals, who are unwilling to take a real salary cut despite the difference in living expenses. There are added benefits: Florida's pre-paid college tuition program locks in rates so residents can pay for their kids' college long before they graduate high school, for example. (We love this program!)
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 4:40:15 PM
A very taxing state
Interesting that these states have business friendly governments. Also Texas and Florida do not have state income tax which is certainly an incentive to move there. In NY the governor is up for re-election so we are getting loads of propaganda about how business friendly things have become. The reality is that NY is tax and regulation hell and things are not getting better here with so many New Yorkers moving to the states mentioned in this article. People realize that the in your face government which panders to the unions and welfare are a lost cause.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 6:37:44 PM
Re: A very taxing state
5 states out of 50 for IT job growth? That's awful. Show's that the US economy is still in the dumper, if only 5 states show significant growth in the technology field. It should be true in all 50 states. How sad.
John Lauro
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John Lauro,
User Rank: Guru
8/9/2014 | 9:10:45 AM
Re: A very taxing state
Reading comprehension is lacking in some.  How sad. If you read the article and the cited report you would realize they are the top 10% of states, not all of the states with growth.  Not very interesting if they just list every state in the union.  If you follow up with the source, you will find double the amount listed, and follow up with the sources's source you will find more details...
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2014 | 12:59:40 PM
Re: A very taxing state
>> Reading comprehension is lacking in some.  How sad. If you read the article and the cited report you would realize they are the top 10% of states, not all of the states with growth.  Not very interesting if they just list every state in the union.  If you follow up with the source, you will find double the amount listed, and follow up with the sources's source you will find more details...

 

thanks -- I did read it all -- and the source as well. You obviously missed my point.  How about a headline that says "IT Booming in all 50 states"   -- something worth headlining. Other stuff is just fodder.
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 11:50:29 AM
Re: A very taxing state
I think the US economy is still in worse shape than they are letting on. When they talk about added jobs in the monthly reports being positive, they do not talk about the fact that these are mostly part time retail jobs. Many folks are working below their capabilities because the jobs have disappeared. The business climate in this country is not good because of what is going down in Washington. Hopefully when the politicians change, so will the climate.
TaimurU833
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TaimurU833,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/9/2014 | 5:27:52 AM
Review & Technology News
http://www.reviewtechnews.com/
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
8/9/2014 | 5:03:18 PM
And who is getting hired?
Five states may be leading the I.T. hiring wave, however I wonder exactly what kind of candidates they are hiring as employers looking for I.T. talent tend to **not** hire anyone **not** male or over age 25. 
John Lauro
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John Lauro,
User Rank: Guru
8/10/2014 | 3:06:07 PM
Re: And who is getting hired?
Fact is, few female apply for IT positions.  Although that point is true, it is supply driven not demand driven why few non males are hired...  Been through many resume sorts, and mostly males apply by about 10 to 1.  Experience tends to be a considerable factor, so unless a person has a fair amount of part time experience while earning a BS, it does put most qualified candidates over 25, but easier to find a qualified 22 year old than a female candidate.  I doun't think there is much age discremination besides for over 55, maybe 50.  Those below 25 are either skipped over for lack of experience or preferred for lower salery depending on what the orginization is looking for.  I would say it's pretty even split for employers prefering experienced to those preferring younger hires.

 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
8/9/2014 | 8:47:37 PM
Non-IT Industry jobs
It's really interestng that more and more IT jobs are in opening up in other industries while growth in the IT industry itself is slowing down. This proves that what is being done here is valid and relevant to society as a whole and not just in our own, more narrow sphere.
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/11/2014 | 10:40:46 AM
Not moving to Texas...
I think I'll stay in WA. No. 5 is still better than no. 25 or lower...

That is, if the state doesn't completely burn up. Worst fire season this year in state's recorded history...
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 12:02:40 PM
Sunshine State
Here on the Space Coast, government officials and private industry leaders are trying to build on the region's wealth of engineers, rocket scientists, and other highly educated employees, now NASA's future plans have changed so much. Melbourne, FL, is home to a number of start-ups (including Apple acquisition AuthenTec), as well as stalwart Harris Corp. and a ton of defense contractors/integrators like Lockheed, Boeing, et al.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 5:39:55 PM
Re: Sunshine State

@Alison_Diana    Thanks for letting us know what is going  on in Florida.   I have vacationed in the state once - and still remember the heat and humidity.  Did the Tampa to St. Petersberg trip.    

The heat and humidity is not necessarily a bad thing - but not for the squeamish. : ) 

Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 12:18:17 PM
Far from the Valley
This list shows a good diversity of options, far from Silicon Valley where housing has become such a dilemma. I know our columnist Jonathan Feldman is a big fan of the North Carolina tech community. As for Texas, those energy companies will need a slew of data pros for years to come. If I were in big data analysis, that would be a good place to try and shine.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 5:41:47 PM
Re: Far from the Valley

@Laurianee   Excellent point, sounds like the place to go if you want to get some real Big Data experience.   Texas is full of opportunity it appears.

impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 4:23:10 PM
Tech hot spots

From an operational perspective the cost of living in the rising states has got to be attractive for those that can't afford to live in Silicon Valley or NYC. The issue in recruiting has to be whether the best and brightest would be interested in living in one of these non-traditional tech hot spots.



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