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AT&T, Verizon Android Tablets Have Big Negatives
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Bob-B_123
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Bob-B_123,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/29/2012 | 7:17:54 PM
re: AT&T, Verizon Android Tablets Have Big Negatives
The approach of the tablet manufactures mentioned above really upsets me. Why do they have to align themselves with one carrier or another?
I know, the rational is that these tablet manufactures are attempting to use the same sales model that is used for phones. That is have a telco sell the tablet for a loss, while hijacking users into a 2 year contract with horrendous termination fees. This allows the telcos to make substantial overall profits while providing very little. Why do we (in the USA) let the telcos get away with this?

I wish the tablet manufacturers would remove the telco communications option, reduce the price and promote Wifi connectivity, either at home, in hotspots, or by using tethering with their little brothers - the smart phone. Oh wait - isn't this the hardware model that Amazon and Barnes & Noble promote!

Surely, a telco independent sales model makes these tablets more appealing to a broader set of users. I know I definitely will not be buying one of these tablets as the off-contract cost is ridiculously high, and since I already have a data plan for my cell phone why would I want another for one of these.

I can only conclude that these tablets are so overpriced no one in their right mind would want to buy one. If the price has to be so high,why can't someone come up with a payment plan model where we buy the hardware without being tied to a carrier?
Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
2/29/2012 | 6:53:21 PM
re: AT&T, Verizon Android Tablets Have Big Negatives
Data plan pricing will continue to keep the U.S. behind other industrialized countries.

"Look at all these wonderful apps! Use them on 3G/4G and keep those dollars rolling in."
ANON1249568612453
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ANON1249568612453,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/29/2012 | 5:55:49 PM
re: AT&T, Verizon Android Tablets Have Big Negatives
A couple of suggestions. Tables would show these comparisons much easier. And if you are going to tell us that plan gives you 3GB for $35 in one paragraph, then turning it around to $30 for 3GB in the next one just makes us have to transpose that in our heads to compare. Just keep it the same.
richardl
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richardl,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/29/2012 | 5:20:43 PM
re: AT&T, Verizon Android Tablets Have Big Negatives
First, Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich are far more similar than they are different. Quick, can you even name three feature diffferences?

Admittedly, probably the most significant tangible difference is the ability to run the Chrome browser under ICS.

The second point I want to take exception to is your flat-out assumption that month-to-month unsubidised is a better deal for everyone than subsidised and under contract. (With the exception that AT&T's rate doesn't make much sence being $5 more per month under contract.)

My experience is that even with month-to-month I end up paying every month in practical reality. So it's better to take the subsidy (provided you aren't paying more under contract- AT&T!?)

If you find that you are no longer using the device, break the contract and pay the ETF. And sell the device if you don't use it.

If you are really buying a new tablet more frequently than every two years then you are really playing someone's planned obsolescence sucker-game. You really need to think about that and admit you are really just a technology surfer. (Fine, but expect to pay the price.)

Another consideration, Verizon offers $20 1GB month-to-month plans without contract. You may need to ask to get this option. (That's what I'm using with my Xoom 4G, and it's all I typically need.)


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