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Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
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JimC
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JimC,
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8/23/2012 | 11:12:41 AM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
The following info was taken from a 14-Mar-2012 Computerworld article: Workforce Opportunity Services is a nonprofit that collaborates with business clients and local colleges to train economically disadvantaged students to fill less popular technology disciplines such as COBOL programming. "They take kids from disadvantaged neighborhoods and provide them as consultants," says former Guardian Life Insurance Company CIO Frank Wander, who now has his own consultancy, IT Excellence Institute.
Certifiable
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Certifiable,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2012 | 1:44:25 AM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Finally, Mr. Preston sees the light! As a former IT worker, I wholeheartedly agree with the arrogance and shortsighted lack of actual training programs within so many large corporations to fill "high tech/skill" jobs. There are so many American workers willing and able to learn new jobs and skills, but at middle class wages within the US. But until some hard nosed news organization like 60 Minutes exposes and embarasses these companies for pretending to not find the necessary skills within America, the business of offshoring and outsourcing functions to cheaper labor in other countries will continue.

Then there is also the massive age discrimination where the over 40 age group need not apply, because previous considerable experience, which used to be a plus, is now seen as undesirable or too ingrained in the past. If companies would commit to retraining this age group, they would get more loyalty than they can from the younger workers.
njacknis10501
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njacknis10501,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/11/2012 | 2:41:47 PM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Great article! This may be part of a larger issue that is not discussed often -- the labor market, especially compared to capital markets, is quite inefficient. Are people working at tasks that are the best use of their skills and temperament? How much could the economy grow if people were more optimally allocated to the needs of the market? As with other markets, the Internet may help increase the efficiency of the labor market by providing better information about all players in the market. It remains to be seen, of course, how exactly this might play out in the future.
bigtalker
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bigtalker,
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4/6/2012 | 3:46:12 PM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Arbitrage (speculation) in the labor markets in entirely to blame here. The global economy depends on undervalued labor. All profit is derivative of this, and always has been. Its simple playground politics.

The Tobin or Robin Hood tax would tap this profit and redistribute it back to the labor force via the Universal Demogrant.

We can't get rid of the sociopathic bullies who speculate on the livelihoods of others. We can however use their greed against them to benefit humanity on a scale as global as our markets now are.

Starve the Wolves, feed the Sheep!
KBARRET000
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KBARRET000,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/28/2012 | 9:58:14 PM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
First, companies need to clearly identify what skills are in short supply - and it isn't necessarily the obvious (technical) ones for IT. Business analysis skills that focus on identification of the root cause of business problems, elicitation of needs from multiple stakeholder groups, and the facilitation of solutions, will enhance IT's ability to deliver huge value to the business.
A number of colleges and universities are starting to offer accredited programs to support the development of these skills. My organization (IIBA) is working with these institutions to ensure they put the right program in place.
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
3/2/2012 | 9:54:53 PM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Corporate America has the unmitigated gall to do everything possible to drive down wages and benefits for IT workers and then complain to congress that they just don't understand why nobody wants study Info tech in college anymore. Gee what a surprise. Kids not wanting to go into a career that features un-ending expoitation of talent.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2012 | 1:54:13 AM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Where is he working?
jfeldman
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jfeldman,
User Rank: Strategist
2/29/2012 | 10:04:22 PM
re: Skills Shortage? Quit Whining
Agreed! But, some companies are still doing massive training of (the right) college grads or others who enter the organization. My colleague's son just graduated college, "matriculated" at a new job and he's not only getting paid and working, but because of the company's accredited faculty, he'll end up with a masters degree at the end as well. The company does this because they have total control over what he learns and it's ALL relevant to his job, unlike going to grad school right after undergrad. A great model for others to follow.


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