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IT Resume Revamp: Spotlight On IT Consultants
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jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2013 | 4:44:56 PM
Re: Your personal IT resume pet peeve?
I review a lot of resumes. Some things that drive me crazy are:

 

- Buzzword bingo: The listing of every technology or piece of hardware you have ever laid a finger on, in the hopes that when your resume is searched by agencies, it hits more keywords than others and floats to the top of the pile. If it's on the resume, be prepared to answer questions about it, and "I racked it once" doesn't count as "experience".

 

- Anything over 3 pages: How long, exactly, do you think we have to spend on each resume? On a more helpful note, if you don't get my (positive) attention on the first page, how likely am I to look at the following pages?

 

- Hobbies: It's a personal thing perhaps, but I really don't care if you are into brewing beer, origami and reading in your spare time. Most people, I would guess, lie about this stuff anyway to try and sound more impressive.

 

- Bad speling and grammer: If you cant be bothered to speel chek you're resume - the thign your hoping wil gte you this job - and can't make sure that what written you've sense makes, then it doesn't lead me to have much hoep about the qualty of your potential work in my organization.

 
snunyc
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snunyc,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/16/2013 | 5:06:07 PM
Re: TMI
@virsingh211: It's undersstandable that a job applicant would want to maximize their potential value. I think the biggest mistake we make in applying for jobs is to think about our resume as a static thing that, once written, never changes.

In my experience, the best thing to do is to tailor the resume to the specific job you are applying for. So if that job ad mentions specific skills, focus on those, and what you accomplished in previous positions using those skills. Leave the rest as a "mention" at the end.



The chronological-list resume is less important to me as a hiring manager than a resume that sums up your skills and accomplishments on the first page, reltative to the position you're applying for. Chronological list can go on second page for me to scan as I need it.
virsingh211
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virsingh211,
User Rank: Strategist
11/16/2013 | 4:51:35 PM
Re: TMI
I agree, we do tend to mention each and every technology we have ever touched or worked just to double sure the best opputunity with highest salary in industry and i guess this is trend and required today, employers seek for employees with one experianced skill and overview of related/ parented tech.
snunyc
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snunyc,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/15/2013 | 2:37:34 PM
TMI
The thing that drives me crazy is the long resume in which the person lists every single tiny thing they've ever done.

I want to know basic job description and then highlights of what the person accomplished in previous roles. Did they just do the job, or did they actually accomplish or change something in their time there. That's what I look for in hiring.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/15/2013 | 10:12:32 AM
Your personal IT resume pet peeve?
Length is a controversial topic with IT resumes. What really sets you off on IT candidate resumes, hiring managers?


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