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Facebook Messenger: 5 Misconceptions
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RoadLessTraveled
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RoadLessTraveled,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/13/2014 | 9:52:27 PM
Re: Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
Hey margo2000,

You can turn off Address Book access for Facebook. On the top level of Settings is an entry for the iOS integration of Facebook. It's there whether the Facebook app is installed or not. You turn off Address Book access there.

I don't dispute what you've seen happen, and that at some point they did get your contacts. Apps could do that without asking 2 1/2 years ago, as you've documented. And I haven't read where Facebook said they'd delete contact info they collected. But the way to tset now would be for someone using Facebook on iOS for the first time, if contacts are still sent with Address Book access turned off before singing into Facebook on iOS and installing the app.

 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/16/2014 | 5:51:40 PM
Re: Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
@Kristin I agree with you. Most of the times we even not agreeing with the terms have to click ok as we need to have that app due to other reasons. A dangerous agreement indeed :)
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 9:18:46 PM
Re: Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
@Laurie or (worse) they just click "Ok" before understanding what they're agreeing to.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 9:17:40 PM
Re: Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
Hi Margo, thanks for your comment. The contact issue -- a serious one -- was from early 2012. The launch of iOS 6 a few months later fixed that vulnerability, and since then applications must get explicit permission before they access your personal information.  http://gizmodo.com/5918693/ios-6-wont-let-apps-steal-your-contact-data-anymore
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 12:55:55 PM
Re: Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
Permissions on FB apps are too hard for most people to understand. Therefore, many people have stopped installing them.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 5:17:48 PM
Facebook double trouble
I'm just annoyed that Facebook decided I needed two apps rather than one to perform essentially the same tasks. The improvements Messenger supposedly delivers aren't anything I care about, and those pop-up bubble faces for contacts were extremely annoying until I found the setting to turn them off.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 4:06:42 PM
Re: The problem remains - FB saying they will behave doesn't change anything
Android will soon be getting granular permissioning, in the Android L release.
margo2000
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margo2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/11/2014 | 3:27:53 PM
Sorry, Kristin, you're dead wrong
Kristin, if you install the Facebook app on an iPhone, it will read all of your iPhone Contacts and send them to Facebook's servers. PERIOD. There is no setting to disable this; it's done when you install the app, whether you like it or not. This has been documented heavily on the Internet. I called Apple tech support, and after denying it, they admitted that it's true. 

http://venturebeat.com/2012/02/14/iphone-address-book/

http://gizmodo.com/5885321/how-iphone-apps-steal-your-contact-data-and-why-you-cant-stop-it

Try it yourself: Open Settings on your iPhone. Now pick "Privacy," and "Contacts." You'll see a list of apps and you can choose whether or not they can access your Contacts. See the problem? Facebook isn't listed. That's becasue they take your Contacts without asking. I figured this out for myself when Friend suggestions showed up for people who I'd had only fleeting business relationships with, who don't know any of my friends. If a "Friend" suggestion shows up for someone in your Contacts list, and zero mutual friends are listed, how do you think Facebook got the name? From you, of course.
robertr1530
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robertr1530,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/11/2014 | 2:59:17 PM
The problem remains - FB saying they will behave doesn't change anything
The problem is not that people misunderstand what Facebook says it will be using those permissions for. Just because FB has an explanation for why they want those permissions doesn't mean the concern over the app is misplaced.

The problem is that I don't want to give the FB messenger app all of those permissions in the first place. Nor do I want to be forced into using another messaging app to do what worked wonderfully from within the FB app last week - send messages to other facebook users.

Facebook of course says it will not be using the esentially unlimited permission to control my phone for purposes I don't like. But the problem is that once the app has those permissions, I am both at the mercy of flaws in that app that might be exploited by others, and I have NO control over what FB actually does with those permissions.

At least on Android, this a fundamental flaw in the operating system. I have no control over permissions. On Blackbery OS, permissions are fine grained.  If I am never going to let an app send SMS or make phone calls for me, I can turn off those permissions individually for that app.  There is no way to do that in Android.  

I don't want FB messaging as a separate app that has permissions to enourmous numbers of other things.  If I get FB messages from someone, I want to read those integreated within FB itself, not as a separate app. 

FB simply wants to take over messaging on your phone, because they want to monetize it. I get that, but it doesn't mean I want them to have that much control over my phone.


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