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Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
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Sajar
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Sajar,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2012 | 3:07:14 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
" Is it that important to receive smartphone alerts that we'd attach or embed a micro-electrical machine on/in our skin? To me, it crosses the line"

Just curious as to what you think of Bluetooth headsets, wrist watches, headphones, exercise heart rate monitors, and any other "micro-electrical machine" that you can see attached to peoples skin pretty much everywhere these days? Do you shudder in revulsion that these people could have dared to place electronic devices against their bare skin?

As far as I can tell, Nokia's technology would be easiest to implement as a kind of temporary 'transfer' tattoo, rather than any sort of permanent attachment, which hardly requires the same level of vehemence directed at "embedded" technology turning us into "cyborgs".
MFWills
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MFWills,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2012 | 5:41:24 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
Eric, I'm with you. Too much.

Safar, none of the devices you mention (Bluetooth headsets, wrist watches, headphones, exercise heart rate monitors. etc., etc., etc.) are permanently attached, and bear absolutely no resemblance to what Nokia is proposing. In fact, a Bluetooth-connected wristwatch (better, a bracelet or maybe a ring of some sort) that vibrated when a call came in would be interesting

While I am not inclined to have anything attached (embedded, anchored, etc.) to my body, one question I have is whether this Nokia device would work with other brands, or is it a ploy to make brand loyalty more attractive? Would the thought of having the thing removed if you switched to Samsung make you think differently about switching?
DRuffer
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DRuffer,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2012 | 6:46:15 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
Personally, I don't think tattoos are a good idea either. However, if you don't have a problem with the die used in tattoos, then this doesn't sound much more invasive. Considering all the other forms of body modifications that people are doing these days, I suspect that this will be very popular and vibrating is the least that they will do with the concept. It certainly is better than patting my phone every time I hear someone's ring.
Sajar
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Sajar,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2012 | 9:21:02 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
I suppose it does depend entirely on what you imagine when they say 'attached' to the skin. Personally I can't imagine them hamstringing themselves with a surgical/permanent only system. It will be interesting to see what they come up with!

I do think your idea for a bluetooth ring or bracelet is excellent though, if they could keep the weight down and make charging less of a pain than it is with many bluetooth devices, and certainly an easier engineering challenge than the magnetic field Nokia mention. Utilising bluetooth would also mean it would be compatible with a lot more devices than whatever proprietary system Nokia would roll out.
BrainiacV
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BrainiacV,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2012 | 7:29:50 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
What about tattooing your finger tips for tactile feedback for teleoperated equipment?
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2012 | 6:42:55 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
Nokia probably just wanted to patent it before Apple claimed to have patented it and then sued Google for it down the road! That(the need to be first to patent something/anything even if you can't/don't bring it to market first) tells me much more about our society than if someone wants to put something minor on their scene to get/receive notice (i.e. lipstick, blush, eye liner, etc...) !
CentralScrutinizer01
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CentralScrutinizer01,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/23/2012 | 1:20:29 PM
re: Nokia's Vibrating Tattoo: A Bad Buzz
I think you grossly underestimate our society. I predict that if this ever comes about, people will be standing in line at midnight in an effort to be among the first to be tattooed.


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