Comments
IT Job Seekers: Resume Liars
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
8/14/2014 | 4:38:33 AM
Re: Resume Liars
@zerox203, interesting points, the trade-off is very real, if an individual has devoted a greater proportion of their time towards education, work and growth, then this has left them with a lower level of people-skills and a smaller social network. If computers are left out of the equation, and individuals with better people-skills are the only ones that get into the door then, the forecast for long-term growth and innovation would not look good.
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
8/14/2014 | 4:20:37 AM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
@Susan, I think, lying is another form of "a resource grab". For example, if a distribution center says that they have already shipped an order to a store but in reality they are going to begin processing an order the next day, over time, the store waiting for the delivery is just going to think that deliveries normally takes 10 days, when in reality the logistics could work out in 5 days.

Or, an employer could be looking for X years of experience/education onto which they would be willing to allocate training resources, to bring the new hire up to a desired level, for the current job. Lying in the years of experience/education by a prospective might get them into the door, but again, it would be a resources grab on their part and overall, resources would be wasted.   
Kristin Burnham
50%
50%
Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 8:41:50 PM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Your resume may get you in the door, but your interview will determine how far you get. As others have mentioned, though, ensuring the good candidates get in the door is a possible flaw in using applicant tracking systems.
PedroGonzales
50%
50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 4:35:00 PM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
@ philyrivera. I completelly agree with you people as less likely to lie to somenone if they are refered by a friends becuase it can damage their relationship.  Also, due to the economic crisis people are more prone to lie in order to get a job, any job.
majenkins
100%
0%
majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 11:51:26 AM
How About the "Other Side"
I wonder about employers that lie in their ads or job listings. Someone should do a survey on that.
phillyrivera
50%
50%
phillyrivera,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/13/2014 | 11:05:35 AM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Let's not forget another aspect of human nature - desperation. I think you can chalk some of this up to long-term unemployed candidates, especially post-recession, trying to find a way to make a living. What's the harm in a few embellishments if you feel it will get you to an interview or even just a return phone call? That doesn't make it right, but might explain some of what's going on here.

Another issue is that technology moves so fast. I remember when clients would ask for someone with 5 years of experience in a technology that had only been around for 2 years. I still see resumes with things like that. That's why I believe recruiting still needs to be personal - and done by humans. All this technology and we still see that referrals are the best source (even if some do come through social media). It's harder to lie to someone directly, or to lie when a friend referred you.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 10:36:31 AM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Technorati & Kristin 

For some reason, this article immediately reminded me to this article on tricks to apear smart during meetings. It seems like the perfect complement to one of those resumes. 

Technorati, you say: "With the competition for employment being what it is - lying or embellishment of skills was destine to become more commonplace."

So, I wonder, who do you think is the one to blame here, the employees, or the employers, or unemployment? I am not saying resemes don't have to be honest. I am wondering if some people don't feel push to the edge and see the embellisment of their skills as the only way out to get a job. What do you think? 

"Unfortunately, this speaks to a flaw in human nature which I have given up trying to figure out much less trying to rectify."

I know what you mean. Yet, every time the topic of "human nature" is brought in onto the table I can't help but questioning about what human nature really is, or if this is just yet another invention of society to justify the unjustifiable, which is what I think "human nature" is. :/ You see? 

-Susan 

 

 
zerox203
100%
0%
zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 9:53:53 AM
Re: Resume Liars
I'm not sure how I feel about this topic. The results of the survey are interesting, but they immediately raise a few questions, and leave me a little skeptical. Employment history is simple enough, but how do these managers supposedly know someone is lying about their skills? That seems more or less impossible to do without seeing the person in action, doesn't it? Aren't previous employers restricted by law to only discuss start and end dates and a few select other topic (or am I mistaken about that?) - so that puts 'responsibilities' in a grey area as well.

If they're saying they suspected someone was lying, that opens up way too much room for bias and subjectivity for my taste. For example, only 7% of the people surveyed said they would look past a lie if they liked a candidate... but that might be because they chose to believe a candidate they liked wasn't lying (when he was) and falsely believed a candidate they didn't like was lying. Like Thomas, I feel like the very presence of computers in this process throws a wrench into these numbers, too. Too much room for false positives (or false negatives) or simply skewing the hiring manager's expectations. It was worth the read just to discover the higher incidence of these problems in IT jobs, though.
Technocrati
100%
0%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 1:34:25 AM
Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Thanks Kristin for addressing resume Liars. This has been going on since the very first resume and I don't see an end to it ever. With the competition for employment being what it is - lying or embellishment of skills was destine to become more commonplace.

Unfortunately, this speaks to a flaw in human nature which I have given up trying to figure out much less trying to rectify.
Jeff Jerome
100%
0%
Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 10:41:49 PM
Re: Catch 22 & Who do your really know?
Good point about the false positives but I also think that people are applying for jobs that they are not qualified at all or very unqualified.  So as a result they lie about meeting the criteria when in fact they don't.  The internet makes it very easy to find jobs, very easy to apply but the net result is that it makes potential employers struggle to the point the jobs never get filled.   Due to the overwhelming amount of resumes and just too many candidates to properly filter and qualify.  I think we will go back, if we are not already there, that it does not really matter what you know, but it really does, but rather who you know.
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest Septermber 17, 2014
It doesn't matter whether your e-commerce D-Day is Black Friday, tax day, or some random Thursday when a post goes viral. Your websites need to be ready.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.