Comments
Windows 8.1: 8 Things I Hate About You
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Li Tan
50%
50%
Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2014 | 9:53:06 AM
Re: All may not be lost for Windows 8

The major issue is about the intent to consolidate desktop with mobile. The tiled start menu makes sense for mobile but for desktop it looks rather weird. Well it's a matter of habit but it's rather difficult to coach the end-user in short time.

SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 3:18:45 PM
All may not be lost for Windows 8
Somethings Windows 8.1 fixed upon the trail of destruction Windows 8 left. This change was appreciable but the update was too late to develop a huge fan base. Sure, windows 8 is faster, but it also is a lot clumsier. Even I could not understand the use of a live tiled start screen. Had it been a mobile device, it would have made sense. 

However with all these flaws some people really liked Windows 8, some very few though.
SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 3:10:44 PM
Re: New may not be better...
It really is true. When I got windows 8 I was lost within its complicated UI. Even after 7 long months sometimes I feel many stylistical things around windows 8 were nonsensical as well. It surely was not needed. What they did right was the copy pause and remove flash drive thing. Also pressing windows button could stop anything and take us to the start screen.
impactnow
50%
50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2014 | 2:28:01 PM
New may not be better...

I recently purchase a laptop with windows 8 and its was a huge surprise the UI is anything but intuitive and took allot of getting used to, I created my own shortcuts to overcome the feeling of getting lost in the tiles. Now I am fine but it was a serious productivity hit in the first few weeks. I am not ready to go threshold until I see what it has to offer and what the ramp up time is for users. I do however like a few of the new features of Windows 8 but the redundant features are annoying.

ExplEngineer01
50%
50%
ExplEngineer01,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/20/2014 | 5:43:05 PM
Re: the wisdom of a single interface
Bottom line is that Win8.x is just "Vista Revisited". Microsoft is getting soft. What we need them to do is to lose their belief that buyers of new computers are not customers or clients, but only joining a group of (involuntary Beta-Testing subject). They think that we have forgotten "GIGO (for the Millenials, that is Garbage In, Garbage Out). One would think that after the Vista fiasco, and with so many folks, corporations, etc. or opting for Win7 OS computers, that they had once again missed the boat, and start all over again, and agree to support XP until they could get it right!
cafzali
50%
50%
cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
8/20/2014 | 2:03:53 PM
Re: Windows 8
@OldITGuy Yes, Microsoft gets -- at best -- 50 percent of its OS releases right at first glance. This is why I'd say Microsoft is the perfect example of a company where first mover advantage was more critical than anything. If you're the first to market, often you can amass enough of a critical advantage over competitors that many of your failures can be overlooked. 

This is especially true in Microsoft's case because people make investments in hardware based in large part because of OS compatibility. And while we could all in theory run Linux on PCs, in reality, that's not going to happen, leaving Windows to rule that party. Few companies amass enough of a competitive advantage that they can fail 50 percent of the time. 
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
8/20/2014 | 1:51:34 PM
Re: the wisdom of a single interface
I think Microsoft clearly made the wrong bets with Windows 8. That said, at least some of the hubris being discussed in this thread appears to have involved the Sinofsky/Ballmer regime more than Microsoft in its current form. I still have hope that the new Myerson/Nadella pairing will make better calls. As some have pointed out, they need to address not only the aesthetic and UI (which it sounds like they might be-- with desktops booting to a desktop, tablets booting to tiles, the removal of Charms, the return of the Start menu, and other changes coming in "Threshold"), but also IT annoyances-- managing and installing apps, etc. If they get the next version of Windows right, and then give it away to both Win 7 and Win 8 users, I think they can erase a lot of ill will. If the next version isn't a big improvement (Some people seem concerned about the new, Tile-infused Start menu, for example), that'll be a different story.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
8/19/2014 | 8:45:49 AM
re: Indexing of external drives
Thank you for this blog. Having to manually index external drives before they can be searched is dumb and aggravating!  This needs to be fixed. Even lowly Windows XP did this better.
Somedude8
50%
50%
Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 4:11:58 PM
Re: Works for me
Yes, Laurianne, just ont he Yoga. Its the only Win 8 machine I have right now though, which I guess says something. I haven't updated my workstation from 7 to 8 yet. No compelling reason.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/18/2014 | 4:09:49 PM
Re: Works for me
Somedude, that is surprising re Netflix and the browser. Only on your Lenovo Yoga/Windows 8 machines?
Page 1 / 3   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and community news at InformationWeek.com.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.