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Wearable Devices: Keep Data Privacy In Check
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shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 6:04:06 AM
Re: Mobile
A recent article explains, free Mobile Security gives you mobile antivirus protection and mobile tracking while concealing itself from would-be thieves.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 6:02:40 AM
Mobile
This is an interesting article. Protecting customer data is an important aspect. With the increasing development of mobile technology, there are many apps which are used for easy access and references. Ex: Mobile Banking apps.

 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2014 | 11:42:12 AM
Re: Tokenization can be done
@SachinEE I fail to get the tokenization concept usefulness in the encryption process. Can you explain a bit further. It seems a good way
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2014 | 11:39:05 AM
Re: Voluntary slippery slope
@SachinEE i agee with your observation and feels the same way the stand alone is the best remedy. I feel that any thing on substantial importance are not to be kept on anything shared with internet. BYOD is the best remedy to carry important documents along. Otherwise the way hacking is progressing, I believe we may have to even prove our identity  :)
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 3:33:58 PM
Re: Voluntary slippery slope
Cloud services need to be checked. They can be hacked too. It seems like anywhere we go we cannot find security from hackers unless we cut all digital links around us, which we cannot, so we need better security measures everywhere.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 3:30:37 PM
Tokenization can be done
Tokenization from peer to peer i.e. from wearable tech to smartphone to cloud can undergo a quick tokenization procedure that encrypts its data. Maybe not a tough encryption, but enough for the data to travel safely to the cloud. This will ensure safe data delivery.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 1:43:02 PM
Re: Voluntary slippery slope
@Thomas I agree with your point. I believe that most of us has taken wrong notion of cloud services. We are trying to save every little thing on cloud to let go its burden. I believe that few things are quite sensitive to be kept there like health records or your personal information. We need to learn and try to find the best way the tech can benifit us.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 1:36:55 PM
Re: Voluntary slippery slope
@Daniel crawry very true. Its about time that few things need to be changed. We do not want to keep our selves possessed with all kind of gadgetry. It creates great difficulty in keeping and handling. I am a great supporter of wearable but we need to find one great all rounder with customized services at the descrition of the user.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
8/20/2014 | 4:18:48 PM
Re: Voluntary slippery slope
Another reason to move wearable data to the cloud, beyond file size, is to share it, Tom. You want to share with your biking group how much you're riding, or with your doctor how much you've been sleeping. But your point is a really good one -- people might start getting more mindful about whether data is cloud or on-device, and not just  default to cloud.   
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
8/20/2014 | 9:44:38 AM
BYOD quote
"When I ask security experts if they have a BYOD program at work and they say "No," I say, "Yes you do. It's just not authorized."

Actually, we don't. We do not allow any personal devices on our corporate network. Sure, they can access some information from the web that can be accessed on a computer with a browser, but I wouldn't consider that BYOD. Even those cases are very rare, as we have computers everywhere. There is NO BYOD at our company - it's not being naive, it's called network security. No personal device is allowed on the corporate wireless intranet and the guest wireless is on a whole diff Last time I checked, no mobile devices can plug into the physical network. Am I missing something here? Maybe our definitions of BYOD are different?

To the article's point, there was a quote about wearables connecting directly to the internet - I don't know of any. Sure, there are medical sensors that do that, but I don't know if they would be considered a "wearable". It's a good point though - the definition of wearable might not be limited to form.
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