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5 Ways To Beat The Digital Disruption Curse
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/19/2014 | 1:27:54 PM
Keep tinkering
For #3, better title might be Keep Tinkering. Don't wait too long to release -- and then keep tinkering, a la Facebook, Twitter and Netflix. Right?
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/19/2014 | 1:29:11 PM
Bladerunner Analogy Holds True
Is Bladerunner really that old? No wonder Harrison Ford was such a zombie on the last Oscars telecast.

Seriously, I like this analogy (if a bit forced here and there) and think that companies have to avoid Replicant syndrome. Sometimes it feels like I'm reading the same social-network-customer-intelligence and Internet-of-things predictive maintenance big data use-case scenarios over and over again. The innovators coming up with truly unique applications are probably keeping quiet about what they've come up with, for fear they'll breed a fresh crop of corporate Replicants!
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
8/19/2014 | 1:32:31 PM
Pan Am in science fiction
I didn't remember that Pan Am made it into Blade Runner, but it was also the featured airline of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Pan Am was gone by 1991 (not that commercial space travel arrived on schedule, either).

Orion III spaceplane Airfix.JPG
"Orion III spaceplane Airfix" by Geni - Photo by user:geni Model by airfix. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
8/19/2014 | 4:00:32 PM
Re: Keep tinkering
Definitely keep tinkering. I think what Pete meant by Stop Tinkering was to stop testing and perfecting and just release the damn thing. But the tinkering must go on. Till death we tinker.   
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
8/19/2014 | 6:22:44 PM
Re: Pan Am in science fiction
You know there's a Blade Runner sequel in the works:

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/16/blade-runner-sequel-harrison-ford-invite-ridley-scott

Does that mean defunct businesses get a second chance?
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/20/2014 | 7:50:51 AM
Re: Keep tinkering
I was popping in to agree that the tinkering needed to stop.  There's a saying a group that I used to work with used "Steal our stuff and make it yours".  That sounds like they encouraged tinkering but in reality it meant, this works, customize it to fit your situation.  There is a difference.  I see many people sit there and pick at a project, change, pick, change, pick until the thing falls apart because no one has any idea where the thing is actually headed.  Making course adjustments is necessary and expected but new icons on your app every month or so because you keep finding cooler looking ones just frustrates users.  
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
8/20/2014 | 9:46:51 AM
Re: Bladerunner Analogy Holds True
More than a bit forced IMO.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/21/2014 | 6:16:09 PM
1982?!?
@Peter: once i sufficiently recovered from the shock of realizing that Bladerunner came out 32 years ago (1982? Really?) I was able to absorb your very valid points. Especially this: look for opportunities to unify digital teams across lines-of-business.

From where I sit, the days of IT and devops being the only resources of digital creativity in the enterprise are long over, and the quicker organizaitons realize this, the better off they will be. The average business-side employee is more tech-savvy than ever, particularly in certain industries.

Do you see any particular industry sectors being ahead of the curve in terms of creating cross-functional teams to advance the organization's digital development?

Your point about mobile apps is also a good one: All too often there's still a mobile ghetto mentality where organizations fail to fully integrate mobility into the work stream.

Oh, and thanks for making me feel really reall old...

:)
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2014 | 2:43:55 PM
#3 is true for a small company
I think that while small companies like Tesla only deliver after there are enough requests for the upgrade, larger companies cannot afford this kind of a thing because too many requests can make the consumer lose interest on the company, just like Samsung is losing smartphones sales. Larger companies therefore pay millions of dollars to a wide range of logistics and market experts in every field.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2014 | 2:47:39 PM
#2 is concerning
Do you think companies look for a generic skillset or a specific skillset? Most companies would want an all round employee who is a jack of all trades, master of none, but in the long run, does it really prove to be profitable? employing 5 employees with an average of $100,000 salary is much more while an experienced person (one that may or may not have many degrees in education) can do all that work for $300,000?
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