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BYOD: California Ruling A Wakeup Call
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jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 1:56:42 PM
Re: Personal vs. Work
@ChrisMurphy> "I wonder if we'll just see more stipends to cover part of a personal phone. In all but the most unusual of cases, someone required to use their personal phone for work can't reasonably argue they don't also use it for personal use."

That's what I used to get; a monthly stipend for cell phone. As you went up the company ranks, or based on job role, the stipend would vary (after all, sales folks are expected to use their phone more for example), but it was a fixed fee and you were done. That worked pretty well for me - it didn't necessarily cover the entire bill, but then, it was my personal phone. In the UK I worked for a company who reimbursed based on call percentage. e.g. if my bill was $50/month and half the minutes I used were for work, I would expense $25. That way we didn't get into any issues of work paying for personal minutes and the risk of that being seen as a taxable benefit.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2014 | 2:40:31 PM
Companies should conduct reviews of their BYOD policies
I totally concur with this post. Companies who haven't set up their bring-your-own-device policies should speedily write them up and implement them in a way that offers protection to both the enterprise and the employees. Even though California's Cochran ruling is bound to side-track BYOD for some enterprises, it really shouldn't.There will be other such court battle relating to businesses and ITin the foreseeable future, but other states do not have laws comparable to California's Section 2802 and BYOD is too strong a force to stop. Nevertheless, companies should conduct a comprehensive review on their reimbursement and BYOD policies.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 1:07:45 PM
Re: The next leaps...
Interesting thought on home internet, MichiganJeff. The gray area there (which also exists on cell phones) is how many employees would not have home internet access if they had to pay and did a little bit of work from home once in a while. Unless there are usage-based charges where activities done for work can be itemized, it's hard to say the company should pay for everything.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 1:06:01 PM
Re: Personal vs. Work
Our policy is very similar, TerryB. In the case of roaming data, we require staff with company-owned phones to let us know if they are traveling out of the country. We either pay for data for business travel or make them pay for data for personal travel. It is very clear. The policy also states that nothing will be paid and the phone can be cancelled if the conversation doesn't happen in advance.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 3:14:53 PM
Re: The next leaps...
If employees are using their own devices to access company records and client personal information we should have some assurance these devices are secure. The risk to everyone is tremendous, especially with the number of lost devices.
MichiganJeff
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MichiganJeff,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/25/2014 | 2:11:52 PM
The next leaps...
The next iteration of this suit will be data useage on the personal phone, as mentioned in the article, and internet access at home, which would be the de facto fall back if the BYOD policy prevented access from the employee's phone.  I suspect it will be nearly impossible to find a method, other than company-paid/issued, of staying connected to work that doesn't cause the employee some expense.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2014 | 2:50:29 PM
BYOD costs

There are actual costs for BYOD and the costs of managing devices. The policies should also include language around device security and information stored on personal devices, the next major breach could easily be from an employee's personal device.

TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2014 | 1:29:13 PM
Re: Personal vs. Work
This is interesting. Here, I have the joy of managing the cell service for the 35 or so people who have them. The majority have phones from our company contract with AT&T but a few use other carriers and get whatever phone they want. What we do is reimburse up to the cost of what a company plan would cost for minutes/data for that person's job role. We don't play hardball, technically we don't use text in a work context but we will reimburse if person needs text service.

Where this gets interesting is in data roaming charges. We had guy with company issued phone who didn't restrict his data service during a vacation to Aruba. He racked up $1000 in charges in one week. We paid because we had no choice but not clear what we would have done if that had been employee's phone. Technically, the person should pay it because they made mistake of leaving roaming on. But whether we would alienate a valued employee over that is another question.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
8/22/2014 | 9:29:23 AM
Personal vs. Work
I wonder if we'll just see more stipends to cover part of a personal phone. In all but the most unusual of cases, someone required to use their personal phone for work can't reasonably argue they don't also use it for personal use.   
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2014 | 9:23:58 AM
The legalities of BYOD
Great points around BYOD.  From an employer standpoint, while it does save costs when employees use their own personal devices, yes, it is important to clearly outline how reimbursement for voice and data costs will impact the employee.  Many organizations probably still get away with "you can use your personal device, but we're not covering you for it", which not only raises questions when it comes to ownership of the data on the device, but can lead to resentment, especially when it comes to large data bills.  It's also important to make sure that security policies when it comes to BYOD are clearly explained, as some organizatiosn might use remote wiping technologies if an employee leaves the company, which if not done properly means wiping the ENTIRE device, and if it's a personal phone, could cause some headaches for all parties involved.


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