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3 Steps To Survive The IoT Wild, Wild West
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David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
8/22/2014 | 2:05:55 PM
Overwhelmed yet?
If the scale of IoT wasn't enough to scare you, the list of things IT managers ought to be staying on top of to prepare for the new era ought to.
Some Guy
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Some Guy,
User Rank: Strategist
8/25/2014 | 1:30:21 PM
Not believable numbers
Some (most) of these data points [Internet-enabled "things"] are not believable. e.g., 29% of thermostats aren't even programmable, let alone the small fraction of those that are communicating. What's the source of this data? What are the exact definition of the categories? For example, do headsets count as internet-enabled if they just have Bluetooth?

Finally, are these statistics on the entire installed base (not believable) or just new offerings? And if new, is it just by unique catalog line-item for sale or actually volume weighted by the number of units sold, as well?
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 2:28:37 PM
Standards
Standards are bottlenecking infrastructure procedures and removing flexible operations under enterprises. What surprises me the most is that standards ought to be helping but they are not, hence a common ground would have to be found out that makes standards go with ease of development.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 2:31:15 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
I think these numbers are the result of analysis of the patterns of information and marketing flows. These numbers may not be correct but under a system where many factors are considered (or will be considered) these numbers come close.
Some Guy
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Some Guy,
User Rank: Strategist
8/25/2014 | 2:44:23 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
"These numbers come close"

There are numbers here that are glaringly wrong. Not sure why one would put their faith in these numbers under such circumstances. IMHO, we should wait for the definitions, methodology and source to be explained first. If there are obviously apparent erros in the numbers one knows about, how can one trust the numbers one isn't as familiar with? If you see a cochroach in a restaurant, you don't go, "Huh. There's a cochroach." Your first conclusion is, "This place is infested."

I think we all just want to understand these data. At that point, and only at that point, do they become useful.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
8/25/2014 | 4:04:09 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
Hi, I edited this column and chose the graphic as a matter of interest, to illustrate the variety of items comprising the IoT. The percentages are relative to the entire category ecosystem. So if you have 100% of all existing wearables, 13% of that 100% are IoT enabled.

What exactly do you find unbelievable about that breakdown?
Some Guy
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Some Guy,
User Rank: Strategist
8/25/2014 | 5:01:22 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
Thanks for following up on this.

Well, the first question is where did the numbers come from? There is no source listed.

Second, are they percent by item (e.g., how many *models/kinds/brands* would be in the list on a search of Amazon), or by quantity (e.g., total number of units installed in the world).

Third are they just what is being offered for sale now, or everything that has ever been installed and is still running today?

Fourth, what are the definitions of the categories? (e.g., does thermostat really only mean programmable thermostat, or does it include every bimetal and mercury switch round and rectangular one as well? Does appliance mean 23% of every mixer, food processor, blender, juicer, vacuum cleaner, refrigerator, freezer, toaster, washer, dryer, dishwasher, range, oven, microwave, crock pot, etc.?)

Finally, does "currently connected" really mean they have an active IP address, or just that they are network capable and may, or may not be actually connected to the internet?

 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
8/25/2014 | 5:16:00 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
The source is a SpiceWorks report. Unfortunately, because of spam, I cannot link, but here is the URL that you can cut 'n paste

http://www.spiceworks.com/voit/reports/the-devices-are-coming/

In a nutshell, they "asked 440 IT pros in North America and EMEA to share the current state of their infrastructure as well as their thoughts on IoT, its effects thus far, and how they're prepping for the coming onslaught of miscellaneous devices aimed at their networks."

Spiceworks has less of a horse in the IoT race than, say, Cisco, so I found this report worthwhile. 
Some Guy
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Some Guy,
User Rank: Strategist
8/25/2014 | 6:46:46 PM
Re: Not believable numbers
Thanks. Great report, BTW. Looks like it's just devices at the surveyed sites. Unclear what they mean by appliances, or how much this generalizes to the general world beyond.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
8/26/2014 | 9:06:36 AM
Re: Not believable numbers
Agreed, "appliances" is pretty broad. Logically I'd say the major appliances -- washer/dryer, fridge, stove -- and perhaps coffeemakers. Not sure the point of internet-enabling a stand mixer or food procesor :-D
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