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National Health Database: Good Medicine Or Privacy Nightmare?
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
8/26/2014 | 3:36:11 PM
Consider the source
This "Citizens' Council for Health Freedom" is nothing more than a front for factions that want to undo the ACA. They probably also worry about alien abductions and Sharia law being established in Iowa. 
impactnow
IW Pick
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 3:39:03 PM
Safety and security

While I see the benefits of such a system the issues around privacy and security are tremendous. Having universal access to medical record by thousands of medical professionals is great but also very dangerous. It's currently happening at the drugstore clinics like Walgreens and CVS without many even knowing that their medical records are available in their local drugstore. There is so much sensitive data in a patient's medical records the access at so many points is still unnerving.

Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/26/2014 | 3:46:51 PM
Re: Consider the source
Not every organization that wants to do away with ACA is filled with wingnuts. This group does. however, seem to have its share of conspiracy theories but on the other hand, it makes logical sense that we are moving toward a time when all state's HIX networks will interconnect and either become one database (unlikely) or accessible from anywhere in the country (very likely, IMHO). The ONC said as much and some privacy advocates are concerned -- which has some merit, i think. I do, however, believe the benefits far outweigh any risks. Any time there's change, especially change regarding storage and access to personal information, you're going to have a hue and cry and lots of worry. That's a good thing. It helps stop worst-case scenarios, I think!

Last year a friend had a stroke while driving solo in California, far from his east coast home. It took EMTs forever to figure out his medical information because he couldn't talk (he has, thankfully, improved since then). Had they been able to simply plug in his name and DOB or license info and learn his conditions, treatment would have been faster -- and better. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
8/26/2014 | 3:56:38 PM
Re: Consider the source
Absolutely there are privacy and security risks, as there are any time PII is out of the owner's direct control. My point was that groups with the end goal to kill the ACA have zero incentive to help figure out how to offset those risks. In fact, a breach plays into their agenda. Having them as part of the conversation pretty much guarantees that no solution will be found, because they don't want one.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 7:10:17 PM
Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
You mean instead of having my confidential EMR hacked while stored at the local HMO I can now have it hacked by international criminals?  Sign me up, Obama.  What a brilliant plan!
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/26/2014 | 9:39:36 PM
Re: Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
@asksqn: The hacking is inevitable. This is one of those scenarios where it's fitting to ask, in a voice dripping with sarcasm, "what could possibly go wrong?" As a patient whose medical records span multiple states due to the need for specialists and a cross-country relocation, I can see the value in interoperability and shared information. At the same time, I agree it just makes it that much easier for my information to be accessed. I think for now I'll choose the inconvenience that the lack of shared data means for me as a patient...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/26/2014 | 9:42:27 PM
Re: Safety and security
@impactnow: Yikes! our pharmacy records are in the hands of retail national operations already...thanks for giving me something else to lose sleep over.

Have there been any major hacks (yet) at these pharmacy chains that you're aware of? They'd seem to be quite a likely target.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2014 | 9:34:02 AM
Re: Safety and security
I agree @impactnow. While I absolutely love the idea of having a connected, national healthcare system that will allow for the sharing of records between agencies, the reality is that the more providers and other utilizers of the data (such as pharmacies etc), the more points of entry we have into this system. This is especially worrisome since if the proper controls aren't even in place on the government side, how can we expect these other agencies to have the right controls to protect user data.  Could you imagine if healthcare records were breached at the retail level?  In order for a system like this to work, the security and privacy policies must be enforced on all levels, not just the government end.
M2SYS
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M2SYS,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2014 | 10:07:33 AM
Interoperability is positive, but accurate patient ID is the linchpin
Great post Alison. We consistently hear about the positive effects of establishing state and national HIEs and the benefits which could be derived from these repositories to advance both individual and population health. However, the one key linchpin to the success of any HIE or interoperability initiative is the ability to accurately identify patients and match that identity with a unique medical record. The horrors of dduplicate medical records and overlays put into question the data integrity of certain healthcare providers, some of which have proactively adopted more modern technologies (biometrics for example) to accurately identify patients which drastically improves data integrity and practically eliminates duplicates, and others who still rely on older, antiquated methods of identifying patients. You would most likely feel much more confident in the integrity of health data if a patient's identity is not only accurate, but you know that there aren't any duplicates or overlays that exist for the patient to ensure that the medical data you see is accurate and there isn't any additional information that may exist. We always have believed that when it comes to HIEs, interoperability, etc. the industry is very much putting the cart before the horse in terms of securing technology that has the ability to offer near 100% patient identfication accuracy. 
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Moderator
8/27/2014 | 10:30:57 AM
Sounds like a fairy tale more than a nightmare
It's hard getting a couple of hospitals to share patient information.  Having a true unified National Health Database sounds like something that will never happen.  On paper the benefits probably outweight the risks, but, yes, given the security involved I'd say the risks are probably pretty large.
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