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Social Media Bites Its Tongue
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Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2014 | 3:19:08 PM
NSA???
When I make a post here, for example, I'm not concerned with what the NSA thinks - why should I be? What I am concerned with is what YOU ALL think, just like I would be if we all worked in the same office. That's because like most human beings, I want to be liked. Of course I think twice before writing, just like I'd otherwise think twice before talking.

About Facebook, because I work at home, I keep Facebook on all day - it's my version of "The Watercooler." One thing that bugs me about THIS SITE is that before I log on, I have to turn Facebook off. Otherwise, the logon happens automatically, via Facebook, I presume.

 

 

 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
9/2/2014 | 11:41:04 AM
Re: Here's to Anonymity Online
Yes, linking to Facebook could give people a whole lot more insight into your life if your settings are Friends of Friends (or you're naive enough to be even more open than that). I don't mind linking to Twitter. That's more anonymous, somehow.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2014 | 9:43:52 AM
Re: Social media and identity
And then, of course, not everybody feels socially obligated to click "Like" just because they viewed/enjoyed something.
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Moderator
8/31/2014 | 3:16:22 PM
Re: Social media and identity
Social media has tuaght us few things. One is we try to be crowd pleasers. We want the support from the like minded people. At the same time, we get upset when we fail to gain the desired number of 'like" -s in facebook. It might not have shown up in some other people's wall, so they did not have the chance to 'like' it. But, the original person posting it does not know it.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 12:24:48 AM
Re: Social media and identity
@Thomas:

Indeed.  Case in point, go to YouTube and click the first search result for "what's on your mind".
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 12:21:48 AM
Re: Here's to Anonymity Online
The alternative for newspapers that have to deal with vitriol -- much of it often racist and otherwise widely offensive -- is to get rid of online commenting systems altogether.  A set of newspapers in Maine did just that a couple of years ago -- because they were tired of having to moderate commenting systems upon which people were making jerks of themselves.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 12:20:11 AM
Re: Here's to Anonymity Online
@Alison: Anything that makes for fewer Internet comments is a good thing in my book.

(see, e.g., XCKD # 202, 386, 481)
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
8/31/2014 | 12:04:08 AM
Re: Here's to Anonymity Online
Alison_Diana, I support Florida Today's efforts to hold people accountable for their comments. It is a shame they did so through Facebook. I suppose it was their easiest way to do it though...
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 9:28:23 AM
Re: Social media and identity
"The only person you should try to be better than, is the person you were yesterday."
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 9:15:16 AM
Here's to Anonymity Online
I recall when my local paper, Florida Today, married its online comments to Facebook. Previously, readers could log-on separately (or via Facebook), allowing them to create pseudonyms before sharing their thoughts on local news stories, politics, and other divisive issues. Now, we have to link to our Facebook pages. I have no idea how that's affected the number of comments. I'd imagine the quality has increased, in that trolls have dropped. But I know I very rarely post any more, and only do so when I'm clearly in the majority -- a local coach is arrested for child abuse, for example, or someone locks a dog in a hot car. I will never post about politics, church topics, or something else where I risk hurting a neighbor's feelings or getting drawn into a flame war. It's not worth it. 

In that way, Florida Today (and Facebook) have lessened meaningful debate. I (and other friends) can't deal with the expected vitriol so we just drop out of online discussions if Facebook is part of the equation.
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