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Facebook News Feeds To Get Event Ads
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Rico119
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Rico119,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/15/2014 | 7:57:48 PM
FACEBOOK EVENT ADS
Ok, so I'm currently running a $10 a day Ad for an event I created for the store I work at. I am the PR coordinator here. I spend at least $10 - $20 a day on Facebook advertising since we're a small company and was given an extra $100 to promote an in-store concert we're having here on October 23rd. SOO.. I created an event and boosted it to promote it at a $10 a day level. I don't like starting an event of 0 people going because no-one likes to be the only ones going, so I asked 3 people in the company along with myself to join the event. They then went to our timeline and clicked join. FACEBOOK charged us for this!! You're going to charge a company's own employees for joining an event, not even because they saw it on their feed?... What would happen if I was in a big company of 200 people and had event with a big budget of say $1000 or more to advertise it. It would spend all the advertising money just for my employees to join it! Again it's not even because they saw the event in the feed then clicked join the event it's because I asked them in front of me to hit join on our Fair Trade Decor timeline. This is complete utter robbery and nonsense. I know now not to create an event but just to post a flyer and boost it for much cheaper. 

WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY FOR GOING TO AN EVENT THAT I CREATED AGAIN? It should be if you see it in your feed and click on it then you pay for it. Not because you went to the timeline of the page and joined it on your own. Not like it's cheap either.. It charged each of $2.50 for joining our own event lol. RIDICULOUS. 

-Rich
A very unhappy PR Coordinator/Facebook Advertising customer

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2014 | 8:37:53 AM
Re: Sounds promising
And solicitations on LinkedIn itself aren't even the only problem.  I got SO mad when I found out that this guy who ran a bunch of groups I belonged to was essentially using LinkedIn groups to collect email addresses for spam purposes.

And yet he's not the only one (although he was an especially egregious example).  This, unfortunately, makes Groups perhaps the worst feature about LinkedIn.

Well, other than some of those stupid clickbaity Pulse articles.

...no...no...Groups are still worse.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
9/10/2014 | 2:39:51 PM
Re: Sounds promising
LinkedIn's messages need an overhaul. I, too, get a ton of unwanted solicitations.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2014 | 10:59:26 AM
Re: Event advertising
It really depends on how well they did it. If Facebook recommends something you indeed need, why not take a look? In this case the event ads is not pure commercial action from Facebook but something for your own benefit.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 1:07:12 PM
Re: Event advertising
@stotheco: You flatter me!  :)

Their monetization really hasn't changed too too much since the company went public; rather, going public shed more light on their monetization and their revenues, which perhaps goes a long way toward accounting for the avalanche-like slide the stock price saw on opening day.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 1:05:40 PM
Re: Sounds promising
@stotheco: I think it is the answer.  And remember: Facebook isn't charging to send messages; it's charging to send a notification to the recipient about the message if they are not a Facebook friend.

And really, when you think about it, it's very rare that you need to message someone on Facebook who is not a Facebook friend (absent a message accompanying a Friend Request) where you haven't had an introduction from a mutual Facebook friend at first.

So expected messages and messages from friends still get seen.  It's the unsolicited messages from people you have nothing to do with that -- while still sent and received -- are not heralded with a prominent notification.

Sounds good to me.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 10:47:49 AM
Re: Event advertising
Joe, sounds like Facebook should take you on as a consultant. Your suggestions are practical but it's crazy how they are not implementing this as we speak. We very well know they are capable. What's stopping them from doing so? Ever since going public, their monetizing efforts have been quite weak, so to speak.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 10:36:17 AM
Re: Sounds promising
I have similar beef with charging for messages. If it is indeed an effort to reduce spam, is charging to send messages really the solution to that? 
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 6:24:23 AM
Re: Sounds promising
Sounds interesting.  This has become a good tool for marketing. In my personnel experience seems it is a good initiative. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2014 | 9:57:23 PM
Re: Sounds promising
@Henrisha: I tend to doubt that that move was about "monetizing messages;" rather, I think, it was to solve a legitimate problem: Facebook spam.

I'd really like to see a similar deployment on LinkedIn -- where I have, in the past, gotten tons of spam messages (that is, until I majorly cut down on which LI groups I belonged to).
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