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Microsoft Accidentally Tips Windows 9
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Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
9/4/2014 | 1:19:32 AM
Re: What is the big deal?
"I think MS may apt to Google strategy - make Windows OS finally a giveaway and offer it as its pet to the industry. I believe in the long run it will strengthen the company's footprint in OS area, just like what Android has brought to Google."

Li, I won't think it will ever happen because OS is their major revenue source.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
9/4/2014 | 1:18:14 AM
MS needs a new product to hold the customers
"Windows 8 and 8.1 gained market share in August but adoption remains sluggish, according to the latest numbers from web-tracking firm Net Applications. With its newest flagship still struggling, Microsoft appears to be gearing up for the next version. Early Tuesday, the company posted -- and quickly deleted -- its first official reference to "Windows 9.""

Michael, after XP, there is no stable releases so far from MS. I mean in terms of about public appreciation and acceptance. Moreover now the competition is more with chrome Os and FF. so they need something new to hold the users.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/3/2014 | 2:36:07 AM
Re: What is the big deal?
I agree with you. I think MS may apt to Google strategy - make Windows OS finally a giveaway and offer it as its pet to the industry. I believe in the long run it will strengthen the company's footprint in OS area, just like what Android has brought to Google.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/2/2014 | 6:59:42 PM
Re: What is the big deal?
Interesting, thanks, Michael. I'd be curious to see if Microsoft could simply make Windows free and open-source most of it while keeping the revenue-critical bits as Google has done with Android. It would mean foregoing a lot of revenue in the near-term but I suspect it would improve the company's competitive position in the long run.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/2/2014 | 6:55:42 PM
Re: What is the big deal?
No, not really—and that's a good point, Tom. Actually, Windows aggregate market share is up recently, and OS X is slightly down.

That said, there's some fuzziness in these numbers if you try to pinpoint things too specifically, since the stats theoretically represent the entire computing market, not just the most recent trends. Given how many Windows XP machines there are still in use, this vantage point is massively biased toward Windows. Windows used to have an even bigger share of the market, so the residual effect of that advantage diminishes our ability to perceive gains Apple makes in the short term.

I mentioned that Windows share is up recently. If we extend back a bit further, OS X starts to gain, and Microsoft to lose. Why the shift over recent months? Simple—though some Windows XP users haven't upgraded, millions did, and most of them went to Windows 7. During the same period, Apple offered just about the most incremental updates imaginable, nothing too inspiring.That sounds like a recipe for a temporary shift in purchase trends that doesn't necessarily say anything about the next 12 months, especially in the high-margin markets.

Apple's strategy at the moment is to make existing machines slightly better and slightly cheaper, which I see as a way to gain a few new customers until Broadwell-class Macs compel upgrades next year (e.g. the rumored fanless 12-inch Retina MacBook and 4K iMac). Anyway, I still think the numbers suggest Apple is eating away at Microsoft over the long run, even if Windows still maintains a gigantic lead, and has recently ticked up a bit.

Comparing the profitability of OS X (which is tied to Apple's hardware margins) to the profitability of Windows (which is tied to a million things) isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, either.

It's also important to remember that Microsoft has been forced to essentially make most versions of Windows free to OEMs, which doesn't suggest Microsoft's desktop market share is some unassailable force. I expect more of this diminution of Windows as a direct revenue source will follow, though perhaps Nadella has some ways to create new cash streams, such as the rumored, and hard to imagine, Windows as a Service offering. Anyway, Microsoft's willingness to give away Windows says a lot about developer loyalty, OEM interest in Android and Chrome, as well as Apple.

All that said, Windows remains a very strong brand, Windows 8 notwithstanding. I expect it to continue to be the desktop UI used by the majority of users, even if OS X continues to become more popular. But Windows can still lose a lot of battles while maintaining market share. It's one thing to try to defend your turf, and another thing to keep expanding your territory.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/2/2014 | 6:28:58 PM
Re: What is the big deal?
For all the talk about lackluster acceptance of Windows 8, has there been a significant change in Windows' desktop market share? Everyone is focused on mobile these days and clearly Microsoft is hurting there. But has OS X or Chrome OS really affected the presence of Windows on the desktop?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/2/2014 | 6:19:35 PM
Re: What is the big deal?
I sympathize with your point. I've written a few articles, in fact, in which I argue that the enduring animosity toward Windows 8.1 is kind of baffling. The original release was a half-baked mess, but if you've moved on to 8.1 Update, the OS is fine. I like it more than Windows 7, actually. I don't have much use for the Start screen, but I just pin the dozen or so apps I regularly use to the taskbar, run Modern apps from the takbar if I want them, and enjoy the general system zippiness.

But I think it's clear that there are a number of factors at work. For some, Windows 8 seemed so tone-deaf, it just confirmed their long-running doubts about Microsoft. They've just written Microsoft. Others just really don't like the Windows 8/8.1 aesthetic. Even if the OS is easier to use after Update 1, some people just prefer the look and UE of Windows 7 (for the Start menu at least, despite some third-party replacement options available for 8/8.1). Or the look and UE of OS X. Or on tablets, of iOS or Android, or whatever. Point is, on the subjective level, it seems like Windows 8/8.1 is less liked, its functionality and objective utility aside. The Modern app situation is also still a mixed bag, which seriously deflates the "2-in-1" value proposition. Is it useful that my Surface Pro can be used as both a tablet and a laptop? Yes, it is. I use it in both configurations. But when I use the Surface Pro as a tablet, it's for note-taking, or video-watching. Very discrete tasks. I use it most of the time as a laptop. The "2-in-1" use case doesn't stop me from using my iPad.
LeeB120
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LeeB120,
User Rank: Strategist
9/2/2014 | 5:53:32 PM
What is the big deal?
I have to admit.  I've never seen the big problem people have with win8 or 8.1    I got it when I bought a new computer not long after it came and and it took me maybe 1/2 an hour to make it look just like the winxp computer it replaced.   Yea, that metro screen menu is different but not complicated.   I must have over 300 programs on this computer and use about 10 on a regular basis.  I simply put the links for those 10 in the bar at the bottom of the screen.   I have a question for people. What is so hard to do about that?  It SOLVES all those 'I can't find my program since I don't have a menu problems"   I'm really beginning to wonder about people... for some reason Europeons can't see to figure out how to download a different browser and Americans can't seem to figure out a simple menu...  What the heck is wrong with people these days?

 


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