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After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
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Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/8/2012 | 5:54:38 AM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
"As far as taking away our options, I've known organizations that simply could not write iOS apps because their legal departments wouldn't agree to Apple's terms and conditions."

What were the circumstances? There shouldn't be any reason, that I can think of, why a company could not develop any iOS app they wanted to develop for their own internal use. If a legal department is shutting down all iOS development, I would have the CIO take it to the GC and ask them why hundreds of other companies have approved the terms and conditions but they cannot be approved at this company. If the company in question is a software developer writing commercial applications, then there may be some sort of unique circumstance.
ANON1237925156805
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ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2012 | 9:51:03 PM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
Very good writeup; a necessary antidote to the ridiculous IW column the other day that seemed to claim that the flashback incident "proved" that Apple is no more secure than Windows now that it's gaining marketshare.

I too would like to hear more about WHY the walled garden a) won't work and b) will be inconvenient and expensive. The last sentence states that there should be an exit door. Why can a walled garden not be designed in such a way that it's optional not just to those who want to jailbreak but for anyone who knows enough to realize that they are inconvenienced by it?

A follow up would be lovely. Mr. Feldman's explanations are clear and concise.
veggiedude
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veggiedude,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2012 | 7:37:50 PM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
Mac OS 9 had a much smaller marketshare than OS X of today and yet it had up to 80 viruses - and OS X still has ZERO viruses. Trojans and other malware do exist, but not one virus has infected a Mac OS X user after 11 years of its existence.
veggiedude
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veggiedude,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2012 | 7:33:48 PM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
This article was interesting and its obvious the author knows the subject matter (which sadly is lacking in many tech articles). Apple was especially vulnerable at this time because they dropped support for Java in 2010 and announced Oracle would be picking up the ball. Unfortunately, Oracle dragged their feet. Only today has Oracle announced a Developer version of Java for OS X and the consumer version is still in the works.
ANON1237837896902
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ANON1237837896902,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2012 | 7:14:01 PM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
So wait why won't it help? You made a large stretch to imply we will lose all control over our hardware but never said why the "walled" garden approach will not help. You made some weak statements about why virus software will not work and why windows has sucked but not why the walled garden will not.

So let's assume that this is not just a slippery slope and point out what seems good about this approach. Signed code. This means that no unsigned executable can be used to attack or escalate an attack and if signed code is used apple will have something to go on to find the person. Better yet instead of apples current signature based quarantine system they can quickly disable all code signed by this person.

Apple has already massively nerffed javas threat on most users systems so now we are down to programs with bugs and apples sand boxing system should limit that threat. Bottom line is that if apple can remove a substantial number of systems from the pool of potential attack it becomes even less interesting to try.

No system will ever be perfect, but perfect is not the goal. Too damn much work to be worth it is all we have to get to.
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2012 | 6:23:14 PM
re: After Flashback, Apple Walled Gardens Won't Help
Marketshare!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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