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So What Was Wrong With ICD-9?
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pbug
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pbug,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2012 | 3:48:36 AM
re: So What Was Wrong With ICD-9?
9 was not granular enough, 10 takes it beyond absurdity, as justaskjul points out below. An example of 9 - 283.0, Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia. There are several types - each treated very differently. Warm, Cold. Variations that work better with gamma globulin, or corticosteroids, or rituximab. Etc. And it would be a lot easier to match symptoms to treatments with better diagnostic codes, at least as a starting point. And when you look these up online, the different types often get mixed together, which can easily lead to poor choices by patients and doctors (who are not experts and are not in contact with experts). Better coding would help.
justaskjul
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justaskjul,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2012 | 6:55:32 PM
re: So What Was Wrong With ICD-9?
My favorite new ICD10 codes are:
W58 Contact with crocodile or alligator
W58.0 Contact with alligator
W58.01 Bitten by alligator

W58.11 Bitten by crocodile,
W58.12 Struck by crocodile
W58.13 Crushed by crocodile

Really? I guess maybe these could be useful in Florida?


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