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Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
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Andre Richards
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Andre Richards,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2012 | 6:54:43 AM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
"Google's Android work with it sanctionned by Sun Microsystem"

Talk about ignorance and bias! If that's the case, why all the emails between Rubin and his buddies about side-stepping Sun's licensing? I think you need to get the taste of Eric Schmidt out of your mouth and then try thinking straight for a change.
Andre Richards
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Andre Richards,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2012 | 6:53:27 AM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
And if that's all there were to this story, Google would be off-the-hook. Problem is all those emails amongst their corporate execs talking openly about whether they should license Java or just make an end-run around Sun. They knew what they were doing and understood the questionably legality of it but did it anyway. There's a question of due diligence here, and it's obvious Mr. Rubin and his cronies felt they were above that kind of thing.

If you think Google isn't going to take a beating for this, you're delusional.
ytpete
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ytpete,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 7:22:16 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
Patents != copyright.
ytpete
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ytpete,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 7:19:31 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
I totally agree that there are "programmers" and then there are Programmers. But... did you read the 9 lines of code that got Oracle its ruling? It's a function that checks whether a number is within the given range, and throws exceptions if not. That's all it does -- this is totally trivial code that any programmer (air quotes *or* capital-P) could crank out in their sleep. And probably every other implementation would look exactly the same. You can only be so creative when writing code this trivial. It's not like Google stole some deep engineering secrets from Oracle here.
sensi
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sensi,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 12:20:46 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
Your ignorance and bias is showing. Java was open source and Google's Android work with it sanctionned by Sun Microsystem, the authors, that you choose to side with the obvious and shameless copyright/patent troll in this case is ludicrous.
werkerholic
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werkerholic,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 8:45:52 AM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
Please don't downplay the art and creativity of writing code. This is NOT HTML / CSS as the term programmer has TOTALLY gotten out of control. If you write HTML / CSS then that is closer to being a hacker than a Computer Scientist. Sorry, to break your hearts, but I'd like to see you webmaster tackle data structures and algorithms applicable to linear algebra and diff EQ. Oracle has every right to this ruling. Here is the real issue. Why didn't Google just pay for the licensing to use JAVA in a commercial way? That's actually pretty cheap as a solution. Hmmmm. Why keep secrets via lack-of-license-purchase behavior? Why Google?
Andre Richards
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Andre Richards,
User Rank: Strategist
5/9/2012 | 8:44:04 AM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
Good.

It's about time Google gets what's coming to 'em. It's long overdue. They've repeatedly stolen IP and thrown their weight around in subverting copyright. I know a lot of you don't give a rip about that because you're such big fans of Google but the point is that a lot of what Google does with regard to the property of other companies is illegal--like it or not. Besides, it's easy to write this off when you're not the one being stolen from. Suppose you designed some great software or system and some big corporation with deep pockets came along and copied all your hard work and gave it away for free? You wouldn't be so eager to shift into apologist mode then, would you?
ryancy
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ryancy,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/8/2012 | 3:25:27 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
This is a perfect example of how computer programming patents have become so stupid. Oracle is claiming that those 9 lines of code are their original creation when Java itself was derived from C++, which does have range checking in its code.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/7/2012 | 11:57:46 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
The jury did not rule that "Google copied Java." They ruled that Google copied nine lines of code from Java by mistake. The code has virtually zero monetary value as Oracle's expert said in the trial. Everyone, including Google, knew that they were going to lose on those nine lines. The real question are the APIs. APIs have always been ruled to be non-copyrightable. There are literally decades of legal precedent Oracle is seeking to overturn. This was a win for Google. Oracle needs to prove two things to win a meaningful victory. 1) APIs are copyrightable. 2) You can enforce those copyrights (not fair use). The judge basically told the jury to assume number 1 (presumably so he can rule that as a matter of law APIs are not copyrightable). The jury was deadlocked on 2. Oracle needed the jury to rule that at least APIs are not fair use so they could then start the fight to overturn decades of precedent around 1. They didn't get 2 and it is highly unlikely they will get 1.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
5/7/2012 | 11:44:00 PM
re: Google Copied Java, Jury Says; Fair Use Question Open
If it is all based on that small section, imagine how many other procedures/routines may be open in future cases. Are there websites, such as those for plagerism, that programmers can go to verify their code against after they finish writing a section?
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