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General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
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madhatter82
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madhatter82,
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7/17/2012 | 2:26:35 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
Randy Mott's visionary direction for GM IT fits emerging dynamics. This labor substitution invokes a change for the IT supply chain accommodating strategy implementation. Randy noticed that GM's employee pyramid presented huge risks: key decisions, processes and responsibilities outside GM's direct control. GM can rebuild its pyramid while creating new infrastructure. This is revolutionary. It boldly states the US can supply the labor. We often hear that there are not qualified people. GM understands. GM is taking direct responsibility for finding, selecting and readying their new IT pyramid. The real trick will be evolving it over time so in supporting business needs. Best practices from all over the world (including from the large outsourcers themselves) will be central to execution. Mathisis Tech was created with just this view of the US business climate and approach in mind, so GM has some thought leaders and practitioners it can reach out to.
Sangos
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Sangos,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/13/2012 | 3:40:04 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
I agree with you Jim , it is not just matching competency but creating more value in whatever we do....somehow Innovation is more promoted these days ( a simple route to cut copy paste ) than invention
JimC
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JimC,
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7/13/2012 | 3:33:15 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
GM's insourcing plans are well timed -- considering several years of North American companies' outsourcing of IT jobs combined with a 4-year bad economy -- both of which followed post-Y2K job reductions in IT and the dot-com crash. GM and other employers can now shop for top IT talent from the best schools, plus semi-experienced IT pros whose incomes have been reduced due to the factors I stated. The outsourcing of mainframe, legacy programming work has thrown lots of competent, highly knowledgeable IT pros out into the snow and left them there. Innumerable, mission-critical applications written in COBOL will continue to be maintained and enhanced in India. If the work done by supposedly brilliant foreigners who deliver superior results (clean, understandable, efficient, working code) is on time and cost-effective, then that's the new standard for U.S. workers to match. However, swapping out mediocre productivity by U.S. workers for equal or inferior work is unacceptable.
Sangos
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Sangos,
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7/13/2012 | 3:26:05 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
I think for bringing up new jobs the focus should be on reviving the manufacturing which will lead to more IT oppurtunities and tehcnology edge...America should move from cosuming to creating model
wdgroover
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wdgroover,
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7/13/2012 | 10:32:34 AM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
Only time will tell if GM is doing as the article implies, hiring American developers. I though must confess that I am doubtful GM will seek to hire US citizens for development. To the contrary, I anticipate much of the development process will be performed by foreign nationals and/or physical development performed elsewhere with oversight performed in this country.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
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7/12/2012 | 1:28:53 AM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
Paul,

How is this going to create remote jobs? For an organization like Ford, GM or GE - I don't see them wanting to allow people to work remotely - it's all about social/team building.

And with regards to creating jobs - I think Chris makes a very valid point that unless these are new jobs as opposed to positions being moved from an outsourcing firm back into the organization that the number of new jobs actually created will be close to zero.

It's nice to think that this will result in lowering the overall unemployment numbers out there, but unless these are new initiatives with brand new positions, this could turn into a zero sum game.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
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7/12/2012 | 1:23:05 AM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
But what happens when this new influx of employees joins the UAW? That theory goes straight out the window.
bwdolphan
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bwdolphan,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2012 | 6:38:02 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
You think this is true! Listen to this and then tell me that GM has any intention of continuing any development of any kind here on its "home" turf.

http://www.alipac.us/f19/gener...
PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2012 | 6:14:00 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
Wooo-hooo any possible hiring spike in todayG«÷s job market is always awesome! It is a very promising field to graduate out of college and pursue a career in IT; it has continued to grow and will continue to grow. I think in return this will also create remote jobs for IT people as well as the local positions they hire for. The talent in this field is so extensive and broad it is going to be hard for Ford to locate a central mass of IT people all who poses the exact skillset they are looking for. Good to see they are bringing jobs back home where they are needed.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Moderator
7/10/2012 | 5:43:51 PM
re: General Motors' Big Bet On U.S. Tech Talent
I suspect that getting rid of the high pay/benfits built into the old union contracts is why they feel they can afford to do this now.


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