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How Not To Plan A Data Center
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Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2012 | 2:26:23 AM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
Last time I looked, government contracts went to the lowest bidder... whether it's a nuclear warhead, data center or carton of toilet paper.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 8:37:00 AM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
No one can be as committed to building ships or planes as they are to building data centers and implementing IT systems. I know that the defense contractors have the capability, but why would anyone use them for something so far from their core competency. Does anyone want to make the case that this agency fairly and unbiasedly looked at IBM, HP, and General Dynamics... and then decided General Dynamics' IT and data center credentials are superior to the previous two? If this were about the defense contractors wanting to seriously expand into IT because they are committed to IT, as opposed to leveraging their contacts to sell the Feds whatever they can sell them, we would see all of these firms in the commercial, non-Federal sector, IT market as we do with IBM and HP.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 3:11:26 AM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
I think one of the major things that this story illustrates (aside from the obvious need for a better project management process - lack of communication/documentation in project management is unforgiveable), is that technology marches on, period.

True, there were some major balls dropped here, but storage technology keeps marching forward. Compare the floor space required for 10 Petabytes of Enterprise-class storage at the start of this project with the end date. By the same respect, the amount of data storage required by the organization grows at a rate, whether similar or dissimilar.

This isn't a situation that can't be dealt with - and who knows, had the project been built smaller, would the American taxpayer be later building another facility for this entity to expand into at a higher cost?

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 3:04:24 AM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
Sam - pretty much every major defense contractor also has IT contracting capabilities. General Dynamics, Northrup Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Boeing - all have very capable IT divisions that support both internal and external entities.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
7/16/2012 | 7:56:43 PM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
You would be surprised then Sam of their IT presence by visiting their website. They are the general defense contractor, what they don't already have or provide, they are willing to buy, build, or subcontract to seal a government contract (a document they know intimately). Even their acronym (General Dynamics or general defense) hints at their deep commitment to the cause.

If ever there was a place to build such a megacomplex under such "flexible" controls, where better than the greater DC/Virginia/Maryland area to find government agencies that could be suitable tenants and cover poor (absent) planning. Change the destination to office or warehouse space while modernization programs are undertaken or continue the buildout for a consolidated, government cloud computing host in support of the Shared Services mandate.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/16/2012 | 4:43:05 AM
re: How Not To Plan A Data Center
A bunch of problems, but the one that sticks out is: Why is General Dynamics working on this project instead of an IT firm? They are a shipbuilder and defense contractor.


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