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Apple: Exiting EPEAT Environmental Program Was Mistake
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Appledystopia
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Appledystopia,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/21/2012 | 8:03:16 PM
re: Apple: Exiting EPEAT Environmental Program Was Mistake
One important tip for all lithium ion batteries is to fully drain the battery before charging it, at least once a month. I try to do this every charge cycle, but that isn't always an option. I know people who plug their device in the charger all the time -- even if it has 95% charge left. Their batteries die in 6 months. Apple recommends draining the battery once a month... I follow this recommendation, which may be why I never replace batteries...
Appledystopia
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Appledystopia,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/21/2012 | 7:55:58 PM
re: Apple: Exiting EPEAT Environmental Program Was Mistake
The iPhone does have a replaceable battery. It can be replaced by the user for about $30. $7 for the special screwdriver and $25 or so for the battery. That said, my iPhone 4 is 18 months old, used constantly, and still holds a charge like it was brand new. I really doubt I will be replacing the battery in its useful lifetime. I charge it about once in 5 days. The battery in the iPhone 4 is actually one of its main advantages. Competing devices are well known to have poor battery life, often needing to be charged a few times a day...

I have a 7 year old iPod "classic" (80GB). I use it all the time. It still plays music for 10 hours on a charge. Apple is actually pretty good at hardware design, particularly using high quality batteries that never need replacement. This Macbook Pro with the Retina display is supposed to do 1000 charge cycles. I don't doubt it. Even if you charge it once a day, that's 3 years. Most people will charge it 2-3 times a week. The average user will replace that notebook before its battery gives out.

I actually have a site that is quite critical of Apple. That said, to be fair, they are very good with hardware and design -- beyond just looking "pretty".
Appledystopia
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Appledystopia,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/21/2012 | 7:52:50 PM
re: Apple: Exiting EPEAT Environmental Program Was Mistake
This is probably the best piece I have read on this issue. A few points -- the Greenpeace Guide to Greener Electronics gives Apple a high ranking. They are number 4 on the list, however their products are better than the leaders on the list. They fall short in terms of process, policy, and operations, but not products. Also, Mansfield's open letter mentions that Apple exceeds many of the IEEE 1680.1 standards (the basis for EPEAT's standards) and calls for expanding these standards. I think this piece ends up ignoring a very important point. If you want to read more about this issue, I wrote a two pieces on my site, Appledystopia. EPEAT has their own set of criteria, but they are not comprehensive.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
7/17/2012 | 8:39:52 PM
re: Apple: Exiting EPEAT Environmental Program Was Mistake
Easy to say for Apple after they release a bunch of product that can neither be repaired nor upgraded. There is nothing green about a tablet or phone that needs to be thrown away when the battery wimps out or the display goes sour or the next version is released not even a year later. Now that I think about it, there is not a single thing that Apple makes that I'd consider 'green'.


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