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Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
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Jennifer Abernethy
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Jennifer Abernethy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2012 | 9:26:05 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
I hear from frustrated employees (sales/ customer service etc) every day how frustrated they are that their CEO and/or C-level executives just don't get this social business landscape we are in right now. If they continue to turn a blind eye..they won't be around 7-10 years from now..my prediction.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2012 | 11:39:03 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
Just playing devil's advocate, but I wonder if CEOs took the lead and made more of a commitment to social for themselves and behalf of the company, would results (positive, that is) follow?

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Equipment Leasing
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Equipment Leasing,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2012 | 11:20:21 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
Interesting to see that while their companies might have a strong presence on social media websites, many CEOs do not. All businesses have their own unique marketing practices which they find successful. Over the last few years, my company has had proven results from embracing social media and SEO techniques. Aside from marketing, it is interesting to see the statistics of Fortune 500 CEOs and their Facebook usage. One idea is that many of the Fortune 500 CEOs don't have the time to use social media for personal uses, as they are quite busy running their company. Whatever the reason, they most certainly have many professional connections, but not necessarily as many social media connections.
Sacalpha1
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Sacalpha1,
User Rank: Strategist
7/21/2012 | 11:42:22 AM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
For all of you social networking hype-ers, you just don't get it. The survey results were just as I expected them to be. Social networking as a business tool only applies to a few industries like retail. Most CEOs will never invest the time in social networking because it has no business based payback. Their job is to run their company and with all of their responsibilities, spending time with social networking would be so far down their to do list that they never even give it a thought. The same will be true for most other C-level company officers, with the CMO likely being the exception. Just because social networking is something popular with consumers does not mean it will translate to the business to business industries like heavy manufacturing, chemicals, forest products, metals and mining, etc and in matter of fact is does not translate at all. Beyond retail it only translates to some market segments or for very specialized purposes. This includes industries like telecommunication, financial services, consumer products, etc. where there is some component of the business that is consumer based rather than business to business based.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 9:15:12 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
Agreed! On social networks, everyone is a publisher. And the first rule of publishing is to know your audience and given them the kind of content they need/want.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 9:13:39 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
Hmm. I wonder, too. Sounds like a good story: What Companies *Don't* Have To Bother With Social Networking"

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2012 | 4:49:15 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
I chose to follow the major networking hardware vendor's CTO for 6 months before I unfollowed. Six months where 90% of tweets was discussing wardrobe selection for conference presentations, play-by-play as corporate reps provided cultural tours, and local culinary oddities on the international circuit was not what I had expected when following a CTO. 10% were links to PA product announcements. Having a social presence when one is representing a business must have a ROI for the business or leave out references to your professional affiliation. Hopefully as Ms. Mayer's tweeter following increases to the level of this CTO she will recognize content also plays its part and should be proportionally relevant.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
7/20/2012 | 3:14:55 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
I've seen many matrix or flat organizations that beat the drum of social necessity. They still maintain those org charts and have restricted, corporate strategic planning sessions rather than the coffee clutching 100% democratic vote on everything. Many social fad followers in trying to be "Agile" find themselves immobilized by passive-aggressive line techs who do not feel they have been properly consulted or included in decision making and impede operations until it is convenient missing time sensitive opportunities. It is unrealistic to believe we are all created equally in our educational or professional development and more importantly have access to decision making information (information management is still a critical asset of advantage).

When I was orienting myself to Twitter, I chose to follow the CTO of the major networking hardware vendor who had hundreds of thousands of followers. After 6 months in which 90% of the daily tweets dealt with the problems of wardrobe selection for a certain conference appearance, the play-by-play cultural orientations of their local representatives for the worldwide CTO visit, or her take on the local culinary styles, I unfollowed her. The 10% of business related tweets were one line presentations of upgrades or new hardware with a link to the PA site. Was I impressed with either the CTO or her firm based on this social presence? Actually I thought what a nice gig if you can get it and lost respect for the position even though I still find the products some of the best in the market. Social presence for company's senior leaders must have a positive ROI for the company or remove reference to the firm they represent and maintain it on a personal level.
Lexirodrigo
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Lexirodrigo,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 1:56:14 PM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
These statistics are understandable. When companies are meeting lead generation and sales goals, why should they change what they're already doing. As one entrepreneur once told me after shutting off social media accounts, "I'm a marketer, not a networker."

I'm not sure how much longer this distinction will exist, but for many businesses, social networking is not necessary -- yet.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2012 | 9:14:04 AM
re: Fortune 500 CEOs Shy Away From Social
Thanks for reading, Steve. Going social certainly does introduce some risk, and we've seen some top-level execs get burned by off-hand remarks. I wonder, too, when it matters most for a CEO to be active on social--at very big companies or at smaller companies, where maybe employees and customers expect more or are influenced more directly by their CEO because there aren't so many layers between them.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard


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