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Oracle Appealing Trash Talk Wrist Slap
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PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2012 | 1:04:35 PM
re: Oracle Appealing Trash Talk Wrist Slap
Who doesnG«÷t love trash talking? I personally find it highly entertaining. Now as long as the trash that is being discussed can be backed up with factual data, otherwise it is just someone running their mouth about their opinion. I do however see the point that Oracle makes, if it were true then absolutely a company should be allowed to compare it to its competitorG«÷s products that are similar in nature. If I owned a company and had factual proof that stated my product was better than my competitors I would most certainly point out exactly how it is better when the 2 products have the technical specs. As a matter of fact you would have a hard time keeping my mouth shut and not bragging to everyone that I have a better product. I understand that this is may not be a professional way to act but sometime you have to be proud and flaunt, but only when you can back it up.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
ssibley787
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ssibley787,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2012 | 4:03:47 PM
re: Oracle Appealing Trash Talk Wrist Slap
Indeed, backing up comparative product performance claims with factual data is the crux of the issue. The NAD found that Oracle failed to demonstrate that it had support for that performance claim in the ad. Oracle's claim was hardly an apples-to-apples comparison G«Ű it compared the performance of a new Oracle Exadata system to a six-year-old IBM Power System, and the ad did not provide disclosure as to how the systems were configured. From the NAD report, the Exadata system in the comparison used OracleG«÷s latest hardware and had 33% more processor cores, almost 3.5 times as much memory as the IBM system, and ran an upgraded database software, Oracle 11g with partitioning and Real Application Clusters, compared to Oracle 10g on the IBM system used at the unnamed European retailer.

Steve Sibley, IBM


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