Comments
11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 5   >   >>
Whitney Thurman
50%
50%
Whitney Thurman,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/17/2013 | 7:28:08 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
I often cringe when I see people using "everyday" in the place of "every day", or using non-existent words such as "everytime" or "bestfriends". It is especially troubling to see these sorts of errors being circulated and popularized in the form of memes.
the_freq
50%
50%
the_freq,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2012 | 1:25:15 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
The worst thing is when people, when saying "try to", omit the word "to" altogether! As in, "I'm going to try do this thing." It just really fiddles my biscuits. And yes, people DO do that.
the_freq
50%
50%
the_freq,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2012 | 1:24:01 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
Oh, please. Your getting two worked up about people doing they're grammar good.
okgray
50%
50%
okgray,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/20/2012 | 7:43:07 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
All of the above plus: Try and vs. try to. I try and teach good grammar vs. I try to teach good grammar. I think the latter is correct, but I see and hear the former so much, I wonder if it is also correct.

I remember when I was a teenager. We had a language of our own so that we could talk without parents knowing what we were saying. So, I am thinking that this is a good thing that teens text in text. Teenagers are genetically programmed to separate from parents so that they can make more just like themselves. But, they should learn to communicate in the language expected by those who will be hiring them and buying from them and voting for them.

BTW: This is the first large group of comments I have seen that is virtually error free! This took me 30 days to write. I didn't want to be the only one to mess up.
elsabelle
50%
50%
elsabelle,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/12/2012 | 8:54:07 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
What about the constant misuse of "myself"
ANON1250267029419
50%
50%
ANON1250267029419,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/10/2012 | 8:09:13 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
You're absolutely correct!
ANON1250267029419
50%
50%
ANON1250267029419,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/10/2012 | 8:08:16 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
its because of there teacher's Or may be their just care less
ladyliteracy
50%
50%
ladyliteracy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/7/2012 | 7:17:06 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
Belated thanks.
Have just read all the comments and embarrassed I missed two glaring ones.
Of course your is a possessive (second-person pronoun) adjective.
Also, homophone was meant in the article (think of phone as sound, they sound the same -- pear/pair), not homonyms (nyms as in names for the same thing -- auto/car).
Another mistake sneaking into the language is to add an S when saying with/in regard to.
It's as in with respect to or with/in reference to.
Regards is something we say at the end of a letter -- sending regards -- or when referring to a look (his covert regard).
I had noticed the incorrect use of hopefully but decided not to embark on that fight as well. I means full of hope, not that one hopes something will happen.
Think of:
She was sitting by the phone hopefully.
He looked at her hopefully.
While I'm at it, momentarily indicates 'for a moment', not 'IN a moment'.
Belief was suspended momentarily.
How frightening to be told the plane wd be airborne momentarily -- it will fall out of the sky after 20 seconds?
btw, ending a sentence with a preposition is perfectly correct (as is splitting an infinitive). Apparently some don't realize there are phrasal verbs too: to put, to put up, to put up with.
Such false pedantry is difficult to put up with.
Gives grammarians a bad name.

Can't wait to see if anyone can spot something else.
ladyliteracy
50%
50%
ladyliteracy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/7/2012 | 11:28:41 AM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
Glad to see another in the campaign for grammar.
Texting can be grammatically correct -- abbreviations don't affect the grammar.
Your copy editor, you say, probably found a mistake before this was published. This copy editor has found more quibbles/peeves.
No. 5 = Right! but you demonstrate the mistake in No. 7 (see below).
No. 6 = Yes, great to see the serial comma being promoted but it shd be: different from.
No. 7 = This shd read ["loose".], but that's another problem (see No. 5).
No. 10 = Good explanation; I tell ppl just to throw out the others and you won't make a mistake.
No. 11 = No doubt one of the biggest bugbears. Differentiating between good and well occurs in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Romanian. (So it drives me crazy when French- or Spanish-speaking ppl make this mistake that they wd not in their own language.)
GOOD: morals, ethics, ability, ie saintliness and expertise
WELL: health, general state
They do understand when asked if they can tell the difference between a person who is good and a person who is well or a little boy who is good and one who is well.
A good athlete and an athlete who is well, not sick or injured.
The Olympics provides a great opportunity for ppl to hear the difference however I've heard the mistakes and even in published reports, alas.
Nos. 5 and 7
Please, US, start doing the accurate and rational. No. 5 is right; No. 7 is an aberration.
Don't put punctuation in something you're quoting unless it's part of the quotation!
We're in the digital age.
Typesetters started putting the comma and the period inside the quotation marks even though it did not make sense b/c those little marks broke off at the end of a line. We don't have that problem so we can keep the accuracy of only putting inside quotation marks what actually is being quoted.
["loose."] is nonsense, and not true.
Read The Economist or the Guardian to see the proper positions. In Canada, as in many things, it's done both ways but I'm fighting on the side of accuracy.
That it's illogical and inconsistent is obvious when reading an American publication that has, for instance:
The plays omitted were well-known ("Macbeth", "Hamlet", and "Romeo and Juliet").
but without parentheses:
They did not perform "Macbeth", "Hamlet", and "Romeo and Juliet."
Someone mentioned that some university students in California are rebelling and insisting on the rational/correct placement of commas and periods wrt quotation marks.
Overthrow typesetters' rules/needs/wishes!
It's difficult to understand why the US is so determined not to fix an unreasonable practice. Very easy, no?
Anyway, though perhaps Sisyphean, the climb is worth it -- to ease the mind with fewer nonsensical or irrational words or combinations (or punctuation). Actually I was surprised you didn't include countable and uncountable nouns to point out when to use fewer and less.
Please allow me to add an optimistic note.
Instead of correcting, I always give the explanation of why something is right and the other wrong. Most ppl are grateful b/c it had never been explained to them. Once understood, they can go on b/c the principle/grammar makes sense and they don't make the mistake again. They are disabused of the feeling it's arbitrary with no rational basis so it matters little wch is used.
Alas, the teaching of grammar has fallen below the acceptable level (in UK, US, and Canada) and now often only is given any time in the teaching of foreign languages since necessary for functions and relationships in constructing a sentence.
A group that frequently appreciates an explanation is those who say "with you and I". (And yes, Obama once said "with Michelle and I" and that made it into the letters to the editor in The Economist.) The mistake is called hypercorrection. (See No. 10.) These ppl are often trying to be correct and they think I is correct although they wd never say that normally. They are trying to be correct but go so far that they advertise the fact they don't know grammar -- the opposite of their intention.
Yes, apostrophes are impossible to understand for someone just looking at signs. Some writers, I swear, use them like sprinkles on the icing on cupcakes. Possessive or contractions! not plurals!
Correct is Phelps's medals. That possessive S at the end is only left off it the word ends in S and is PLURAL. Many apparently forget the second requirement.
Think of the movie "Bridget Jones's Diary" and the fact that Bridget is the Joneses' daughter.
Well, sorry to ramble on but the article was sent to me and the temptation to comment, compliment, and encourage was irresistible.
Thank you for shining a light on an essential element of clear and precise communication generally understood.
Richard Corso
50%
50%
Richard Corso,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/3/2012 | 9:45:51 PM
re: 11 Most Common Grammar Gaffes On Social Media
Who cares when you have the likes of Twitter speak - OMG etc As long as you're understood who cares about correct grammar - to the Americans Grammar is Mothers mother :-)
Page 1 / 5   >   >>


The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.