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FBI's Sentinel Project: 5 Lessons Learned
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someone23
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someone23,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/6/2012 | 2:56:04 AM
re: FBI's Sentinel Project: 5 Lessons Learned
ISentinel is online. Great. but I don't agree with what's said in this article too much. Commercial software playing an important role? Sort of. Documentum is not a big piece of it and only helps FBI get its archive certification 50-whatever. It's not used for primary document storage. Private sector experience helping? Perhaps. I think kicking out Lockheed had more impact than hiring Fulgam. If anything it says something about how hard it is to coordinate a team of 300 people like the original program.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/3/2012 | 8:51:52 PM
re: FBI's Sentinel Project: 5 Lessons Learned
This is good news. Maybe next time the FBI will file lawsuits against the financial companies who held this country hostage because it seems like when the economy tanked, it was all planned, and seems like if it would have been stopped, it would have had been a big case; possibly to test Sherman Antitrust.

Secondly, my neighbor, who recently moved, and was a special investigator at The FBI wasn't very technically savvy. Agile Project Methodology works very well, which we used at other companies. But when my neighbor yelled at me for hacking into the FBI when I installed Firefox (FBI doesn't use Internet Explorer) I was a little concerned about the technical capabilities within the FBI. Sharepoint is a wise choice. It will likely have a vulnerability sometime soon, which might be patched with the right IT and change management teams.

When I asked for a job at the FBI, at first, he said I'd have to move to Silicon Valley, so I considered this for a while.

When I asked him again, my neighbor said I had to be Catholic. Which was weird words to hear come out of the mouth of a FBI director-of-sorts, who investigates discrimination issues to the Supreme Court, including the recent Costco court cases where someone decided to challenge being passed up on a promotion to the US Supreme Court, through his office.

I really like Costco, and wondered why he recommended that case through his office. Anyways, he's taken some time off from work lately, likely because of back issues. I caught him picking up heavy boulders in his front lawn, and took some videotape of it. When I asked him if he needed any help, he said No, and was looking forward to having next week off. Which he took off, after his back surgeon wrote a strong prescription for the backpain he was having.

I don't understand him sometimes. Costco is a great place to shop, but in order to keep costs low, you have to have productive employees, who make customer service a priority.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/3/2012 | 8:40:30 PM
re: FBI's Sentinel Project: 5 Lessons Learned
I was talking to my former neighbor, who is a Director at the FBI about this and other issues at the FBI. He investigates labor issues to the Supreme Court, including the recent issue at CostCo, where a bunch of women weren't doing their job and passed up on promotions. It's a sad story for sure, but you'll have to read the supreme court case documents, which will likely be available on Sentinel in a few months when someone figures out how to use the program.

Anyways, James wanted a new computer, so as a security-minded individual, I installed FireFox on it, and when I did, he thought I hacked into the FBI and threatened to make a phone call.

Apparently they use FireFox because it's more secure, and rightfully so. Google had its sourcecode stolen with Internet Explorer, and it created some work for the FBI (not labor related) Anyways, by installing the free program (not pirated), with that icon on the desktop, he thought I hacked into the FBI.

Anyways, it seems that a lot of idiots at the FBI need retraining, or possibly to retire, even this guy who runs a "Special Investigations Team" in Labor, or perhaps he needs a team to help him figure out how the hell to use technology.

Based on this article, it seems the FBI can't secure itself, Agile methodology probably works, until someone finds a vulnerability in Documentum, or Sharepoint. This shouldn't take long, and it will likely go unpatched for a while, just long enough for some technical gumshoe.

I applied for a job at the FBI but they said I had to be Catholic. Which I think is odd to hear coming from the mouth of a man who investigates discrimination issues at the FBI. Since then, I saw him picking up 200-lb heavy boulders in his front yard. When I asked him if he needed any help, he said no. Later, he said his back hurt and he took a lot of time from work, probably meaning that the FBI couldn't file new lawsuits relating to labor issues in Finance or New York. Which is great news for The Financial Industry, who held the American Public at gunpoint, and forced a number of legislative changes including passing of a bill worth $787 Billion Dollars ($787,000,000.00) to recapitalize banks which apparently were a little short on money in the vault.

So if you work at the FBI, I've created an exercise for you; a game of sorts- It's called "Find The Guy Who Doesnt Like Costco, And Reccomended A Supreme Court Case" I've given you a profile. So find that person, because he's likely going to retire soon.


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