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General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
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Polaris Silvertree
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Polaris Silvertree,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2012 | 12:41:47 AM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
I think there's more to this than meets the eye. First, I heard that Mott was unimpressive at HP when he was the CIO and quite honestly I heard the problems that were impacting the company's productivity were due to his lack of responsiveness and general leadership. From what I could gather, it was no surprise he had to leave HP.... I can't help but think this is part out of spite than anything else. The writer is right -- its very high-risk to all of sudden switch gears like this -- especially as fragile as the US auto industry has become. The disruption is enough to erase margins, IMHO. That said, I agree somethings probably make sense in bringing back in-house. But the way this is being done -- its a bit too sudden and global to be honest to make total sense. And from what I understand, TODAY HP Enterprise Services (former EDS) still does do quite a bit of work for GM today (but nothing like how it use to be). The comment about IT Outsourcing going to other countries I think is a bit misleading -- its not like IT contractors are all based in India. My friends in Michigan and Italy still support GM today. That was a GM thing. GM has an international presence... and with that comes international IT support.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/8/2012 | 8:16:02 PM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
With regards to the choice of Austin for GM's technical center, I think that we could all see that coming, considering Mott's links to Dell.

Also, I wouldn't be surprised to find out that GM is going to be leaning on Dell as a supplier of cloud-based systems, commodity-level hardware and infrastructure consulting/management.

Somehow, it all just makes sense... if you no longer want IBM or HP involved in your operations, hire away the CIO from Dell.

I'd also be willing to wager that one of the other technical centers will be around Nashville.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/8/2012 | 8:12:26 PM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
Not that it's very tech related, but when shopping for a vehicle, always look at the first digit in the VIN number to determine the country of origin of the vehicle. There are plenty of resources that can help you decode it - but generally a 1 means that a vehicle was built in the US, 2 means Canada, 3 means Mexico... when you get overseas, things start to change.

Something else to realize, vehicle content doesn't always equate to where it was manufactured. For example, it's possible to buy a Dodge build in Canada (2 in the VIN) but have the engine built in the US and the transmission built in Germany.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
9/8/2012 | 4:36:23 AM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
You're correct. That's corrected.
cchranko6061
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cchranko6061,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/7/2012 | 8:01:30 PM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
Nice fact checking! EDS has not been been used since HP changed it to HP Enterprise Services in 2009: "The center is a major step in GM's IT overhaul under new CIO Randy Mott, under which the automaker is hiring employees to do technology work and moving away from outsourcers such as EDS and IBM."
phenry017
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phenry017,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/7/2012 | 6:40:59 PM
re: General Motors Picks Austin For 500-Job Tech Center
I used to buy only GM vehicles until I learned a couple of years ago that they outsourced all their IT work. It enraged me that they were asking people to "buy American" while they were sending all the IT work overseas. Now I might have to look into their vehicles after this announcement.


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