Comments
Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
aeisen079
50%
50%
aeisen079,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 4:00:44 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
I think that Windows 8 may be more of a game changer for small businesses than Enterprises, especially with the integration into Windows Live. If that function is extended to Microsoft Online Services and Office 365, then you may be able to remove the need for an onsite server as long as you have a reliable Internet connection. Shared and network document could be moved to a SharePoint Document Library, Email would be through Exchange Online, and Web Conferencing through Lync. In addition, a limited number of policies could be created through ActiveSync. This would also allow for greater accessibility.

This would eliminate the need to have an onsite server and, if the small business is comfortable with BYOD, it may eliminate the need to purchase client computers.

I don't see Windows 8 replacing Windows 7 in an Enterprise environment, but it may be the beginning of the end of the small business server.
Gideon
50%
50%
Gideon,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2012 | 4:37:25 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
I have Windows 7, and I plan to buy a new brand machine loaded with Windows 8. I will give Windows 8 a try for about a year, and if everything is a ok., then, I will migrate! As for my computing environment, I do focus on Windows and Linux (Ubuntu). Each has its pros and cons. I am multi-tasking, and I get the best of both worlds, unlike some people who are so parochial in their thinking mode! Well, we need those people anyway. At least I can make money, either way! When it comes to writing GUI apps, I will always choose Windows environment. However, when it comes to writing console apps or especially database programming (Oracle), I will choose either one, dependent on the client. Database programmign is pretty stable, and not as radical as GUI. For that reason, a good programmer with solid PL/SQL (like me) can write for any platform that supports Oracle!
Gideon
50%
50%
Gideon,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2012 | 4:34:14 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
That is their (Google) loss. The whole world does not revolve around Linux! Microsoft will continue to evolve, innovate, and yes, makes some mistakes along the way. Windows OSes hold sway in the world. No one is going to ditch it overnight. At least not the enterprise that has invested most of their IT operation on Windows platform!
Gideon
50%
50%
Gideon,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2012 | 4:31:27 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
I thought I am the only one that knows about Gartner's unpredicatability! I hadly recall anything that were correct in their predictions! And I'm still more surprised that they are highly recognized!
TreeInMyCube
50%
50%
TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2012 | 2:25:43 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
Windows 7 is important today; Windows 8 will be important in 12 months or so, after the first big "service pack" or whatever MSoft chooses to call it. A close look at Information Week webinars showed offerings to help me plan my Windows 7 transition, as recently as this past summer. I agree with the other commenters below: in the enterprise, we will need additional ergonomic changes to promote widespread use of touch screens, and migration/porting apps for Win8 RT tablets will talk some time. Let's reexamine this story on St. Patrick's Day 2013, and see what has changed.
pvan cleef280
50%
50%
pvan cleef280,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/30/2012 | 12:43:35 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
One argument frequently made against enterprise adoption of new desktop software is that it will drive up support costs because it is "so different" from the existing standard: an eleven-year old GUI that frankly doesn't look all that different from all the other platforms' GUIs of the early aughts. At the same time, the main driver behind the Consumerization of IT is the fact that end-users often have much better and certainly more modern technology in their home office than at their place of employment (cell phones, tablets and laptops/desktops). I don't understand why corporate end-user computing strategists continue to shy away from changing the end-user experience for fear of disruption - their users have already embraced these new technologies for home use. Change is inevitable.
mamberg019
50%
50%
mamberg019,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2012 | 1:17:16 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
I been using windows 8, the Beta version and it took about a day to figure out that it looks a lot like windows 7 once you get past the tiles. As I look around the large global company I work in , and see how embedded they are in the windows world as a desktop solution with all the bells and whistle, I cannot see them changing to that other desktop solution. Oh I forgot what that one was.
SteveAtVeriko
50%
50%
SteveAtVeriko,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2012 | 1:12:41 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
With a little work, it is possible to make Windows 8 Pro look and act a lot like Windows 7 Pro or Ultimate. Then you can get the other benefits without the hassle of the new GUI. But I don't think Microsoft likes you to do that. I can see the new Windows 8 GUI as being appropriate for some types of users and some applications, but I still expect it to have a slow adoption rate. The costs for training, support, and programming will be significant for the new GUI. Even if a company was to adopt Windows 8 with the old style GUI, support costs would definitely go up somewhat. With the economy being what it is, I think managers are going to be really skeptical on the ROI for Windows 8.
Mike_Acker
50%
50%
Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2012 | 1:01:43 PM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
to me, W8 is a "Sea Change" : I see MSFT as going into gaming/entertainment. Dell is already offering workstations loaded with Linux(Ubuntu) ... Following the hack in 2010 Google no longer allows employees to use Windows ... anybody follow me on this surf ?
Andrew Hornback
50%
50%
Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2012 | 12:31:35 AM
re: Is Windows 8 Too Risky For IT?
Note to the GUI designers at Microsoft - being able to do all sorts of whiz-bang graphical stuff in the GUI is great... for the home user. For business, I don't want my computing horsepower (resources) wasted to render something like Aero or even that annoying Clippit thing from the older versions of Office.

If you REALLY want to consider what the next generation of GUIs should look like, perhaps you should take a look back to the past for a second. Dig up some screenshots of IRIX (my personal favorite), OpenLook or even Windows 3.1.

I have to wonder if any of Microsoft's GUI designers even recognize those products, or remember the names. Way back in the day when computing power and screen real-estate cost real money, our systems didn't get cluttered up by all of this junk that doesn't do the user a damn bit of good aside from offering some eye candy and helping our systems turn cold air into hot.

As it is, I've switched all of my Windows 7 systems from Aero back to the Classic View (although, oddly enough, some applications don't follow that setting anymore). And honestly, I'll look at Windows 8 (you have to, in this profession at least), but I doubt that I'll be formatting and rebuilding my systems from scratch. There's no value in it - what do we gain from it, honestly?

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Nov. 10, 2014
Just 30% of respondents to our new survey say their companies are very or extremely effective at identifying critical data and analyzing it to make decisions, down from 42% in 2013. What gives?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of November 16, 2014.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.