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Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
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moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/8/2013 | 2:45:17 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Unfortunately, RichMNY is right. After doing more research I determined that my Dell PC's BIOS does not support a feature (some type of data execution process - DEP) that Windows 8 requires. And Dell provides no upgrade. So, instead of upgrading for $40 to Windows 8, I'm faced with paying $75 for an OEM version of Windows 7 64-bit. Oh well, at least I can get a couple more years of use out of my aging Core 2 Duo PC that way. BTW, I have tried Windows 8. It's OK, sort of like the Gadgets in Vista on steroids with all the "app tiles" on the start screen. It is easy enough to get to the real desktop, but I put Start8 from Star Dock on it for my sister so it'll take her directly to it, and bypass the nearly useless apps. I'm sure they'll be fine on a tablet, but not for a desktop PC.
JamesFaction
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JamesFaction,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2013 | 4:50:14 AM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Your article starts off saying "Windows 7 is fine, why should I bother?" the answer to that is Windows 8 is faster at everything, more efficient, and supports hardware and connectivity of all kinds better than Windows 7. Yet the article states "I couldn't come up with any good answers".

THEN you did this odd newbie thing: You confused software with hardware.

Windows 8 is not a tablet.

Windows 8 can run on a tablet and works great with touchscreens.

But you don't need a touchscreen to run Windows 8.

I've been running Windows 8 on my 3-year-old non-touchscreen laptop (it weighs about 5 pounds too) and it runs far far better than Windows 7. Granted, the new Start menu took a bit of getting used to - for about a week. It didn't slow me down much, if at all, and the advantages of Windows 8 shone through for me really quickly once I started using it for work and play, day to day.

Far too much FUD out there about Windows 8. The truth is, Microsoft has done a really good job under the hood, and the GUI is actually good too. Get in there and upgrade already.
Mike_Acker
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Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:56:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
=" when it really doesn't have much in the way of benefits to provide."

as i mentioned earlier.... the halls are littered with the wreckage of hacked systems. after some study I don't see that MSFT -- or anyone -- will be able to correct the windows o/s with respect to security: the construction based on RPC leaves too many ways into the kernel. the LINUX architecture is better from the security standpoint. there are still trouble spots though, -- "MITB" comes to mind...

that said the new threat that seems to be coming up on radar is supply channel malware -- stuff that gets into the 'firmware' in the manufacturing process somehow. this will be a threat none of us are accustomed to dealing with
msimko110
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msimko110,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:36:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
It's better. If you don't see it, so be it. You're probably too busy fixing your computer anyway.
msimko110
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msimko110,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2012 | 5:34:50 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I've taken a look at Win8 too. I can't see it being productive. The split personality of the OS is enough to make it unusable.
I got off the upgrade merry-go-round a few years ago when I went to Ubuntu. Like Mac users, I don't have the constant nag messages, nor the energy draining maintenance of a Windows system. The OS interface is more usable and familiar to me than Mac, and has some neat features like multiple desktops and super easy software installs. Win 8 is trying to copy the software install feature with the WinStore.
Now that I've been spoiled, I find using a Windows computer to be frustrating. I ain't going back. If you like Windows, that is nice. Stick with it. But you M$ fan boys should know that Linux is alive and well, and has gotten even better while you weren't looking.
gchanman
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gchanman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2012 | 6:31:55 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
One word should make you want to upgrade, BIOS. Second word, VIRUS. Real Windows 8 machines will no longer use a BIOS.

Ever had a root or BIOS virus? Hours and hours of wasted time. Best overview writeup I have seen is here, granted it is government related but most of it also applies to small businesses as well.

http://gcn.com/articles/2012/1...

Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
10/16/2012 | 4:45:15 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Excellent point. Most users are not IT experts. I work with people who know one and only way to access their files. Teaching them more than approach just confuses them and gets in the way of what they truly want: to get their work done.

Every time a GUI changes, users get confused and frustrated. Why would any business willingly seek that?
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 4:30:38 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
There are some good points for Windows 8. Most of your comments do not reflect corporate use though. Boot faster? With pre-login security processes, our computers take several minutes to boot, that Win8 can shave a few seconds off that has zero impact on anyone. Batterylife is not applicable to plugged in desktop units. Same identity system - not applicable since in the office they will use the corporate login and not their live/gmail login. What Microsoft should be pushing is for a way to link corprorate AD domain accounts to the live/gmail ones so people really can work on something at home, save it on skydrive, come to work and log in with their domain account and still securely access their skydrive files.

training is a tough one, I think some people will grab it easily and others will require extensive multi-hour training and be far less productive for years as they constantly switch between the two environments (i.e. Loading a doc in word versus loading a pdf is a completely different system)

In my personal experience, I would say 75% of the users I support would not want Win8 - some because of the one-app-per-screen limitations, but primarily because of the lack of customization. Currently, each and every user individually changes their background, screen resolution and font size carefully until they get one that works for them and shows the amount on the screen they want. They will simply not accept a metro environment that imposes a single unchangeable startscreen background, resolution and font size in the apps. people seem to be ok with it on tablets, but on the desktop where they run their lives by having 8 screens open, I would really doubt Metro would be welcome.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 4:09:26 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I am sure millions will purchase Win8. it will be preinstalled on all new computers soon. However your comment on the cost of upgrading shows a lack of thought - at least for the corporate environment. If the computer must be replaced, the cost will be significantly more than $15. If the computer does not need to be replaced, first I doubt there will be wholesale adoption, most companies are reluctantly moving from XP to 7, but even if they do adopt the infrastructure and support training costs far outweigh the software itself.

For example, some things to consider in moving from XP to Win8:

Ghost-style build processes do not work with Win8 (due to SID changes) and must be replaced by sysprep/AIK ( a whole new system that is quite complex especially when multi-casting is required)

Win8 cannot be locked down adequately by server 2003 domain GPO's, requiring a domain upgrade to at least hybrid mode and then a complete revisit of the corporate GPO's - and trying to make them work correctly will probably be a long and expensive task. Even simple GPO functions like preventing access to some control panel applets are completely different in Win7/8 GPO's's and have to be carefully researched to make sure they work the same. Another example, We are currently working through a longterm problem where by locking down to prevent users from messing up their video settings, the IE icon on the desktop disappears despite no mention of it in the GPO setting descriptions - this is what the world of Win7 GPO's is like and Win8 doubles the number of items over Win7!

Server2003 Print Servers will not distribute Win8 print drivers, necessating upgrades of print servers to server 2008 (or 2012, I am unsure)

Even ignoring the cost of user-level training, the support-level changes can be daunting and will require retraining support staff on changes in support procedures - examples just for profiles: processes for bulk deletion of old profiles no longer work under 8, changing to roaming profiles - particularly during the interim when both environments are in place and users are moving from one environment to another and then supporting it, requiring sysprep to modify the "default profile" (are you familiar with how to modify the default IE settings in the default profile on 8 using sysprep? it requires significant training), etc.

many customized scripts need to be located and revisited due to the change in location of objects (c:\documents and settings now becomes c:\users, c:\program files versus c:\program Files (x86), etc.

We are finishing up an XP to 7 migration and the biggest headache was in checking each and every program for compatibility. We use a LOT of old (some are 1990's era) software and many of them would not run, requiring either extensive (expensive) compatibility modification or purchasing replacements. Which is good in the long run but requires cash and training and complaints because it doesn't work the same.

No, the actual cost of upgrading from XP to 8 is far more than simply buying a new license and that total cost must be carefully weighed by management when making decisions.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2012 | 3:39:02 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I work in K-12 and I can see some benefits of Win8. The main screen with its big clickable icons is exactly what the elementary schools need - assuming we can enforce an unchangeable homogenous one - and the full-screen only paradigm will work well for that age group, though I hope we can turn off most of the functionality of the charms bars via gpo otherwise it is just play time.

on the other hand I believe the staff will have real difficulties. Yesterday I had a tech call because the user could not find Outlook. Their "mail" icon was no longer on the desktop and they were unable to find it because it was "hidden" inside of the "Microsoft Office" menu and wasn't named "mail" but "Microsoft Outlook 2010" - now imagine this person attempting to find documents, each program has a different system of locating files. Office 2010 uses a standard file-selector with "computer" and mapped drives, but if they click on a picture, they are in a completely different environment and finding the next picture uses a completely different method.

Just the idea that sometimes you use the task bar at the bottom and sometimes you have to go to the left side and swipe down to find a running program is going to cause massive headaches
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