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Microsoft: 100,000 Windows 8 Apps Coming
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Rocwurst
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Rocwurst,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2012 | 6:06:29 AM
re: Microsoft: 100,000 Windows 8 Apps Coming
It's been 11 years since the iPod launched, 5 years since the iPhone and 2.5 years since the iPad exploded onto the market and Microsoft is still a rounding error in the media player, phone and tablet markets.

Meanwhile, the iOS installed base is already north of 450 million devices - it will be at least 650 million by this time next year at current growth rates.

The Apple App Store continues as the Godzilla of the app market in terms of developer revenue (6x greater than Android according to Distimo) app numbers (600,000 apps, 250,000 tablet-optimised apps), downloads, ad revenue (61% of mobile ad revenue), content and developer numbers (4x greater than Android) etc.

Microsoft would of course cheer-lead Windows 8 with impressive sounding predictions, but the reality of the task ahead is no small mole-hill.
harryE
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harryE,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2012 | 5:44:31 AM
re: Microsoft: 100,000 Windows 8 Apps Coming
The great thing for me is that since I switched to Ubuntu I must not care. Microsoft can do what they want with Windows - I have found a clearly better OS and a more efficient working environment. Windows needed urgently innovation but I am not convinced that Windows 8 is the right way. I respect the courage of Microsoft to break-up with a lot of ugly Windows legacy and removed the insane clutter from Windows but the usability of version 8 on a desktop is a disaster. Microsoft has the money to pour in developers but I can't see that the apps world for Windows 8 will see great momentum. I assume that most users are quiet conservative and want to continue to use their old programs. Apps make sense on mobile devices but on a desktop? Probably this is only an approach to dry out the free and open Internet and to shift browser based services to the OS and create that way a proprietary (Windows based) environment which competes with browser apps. Since Microsoft is NOT capable to keep pace in the browser development with Mozilla and Chrome they try to win the browser war that way (by reducing the relevance of browsers in general). Seen from a development perspective all that is sick. A world with conventional programs and browser apps would be the best solution. But that endangers Microsoft market position. Open source software is causing pressure to the normal programs and HTML5 in a browser is on the way to get quiet powerful. But HTML5 is platform-agnostic and that is something what Microsoft and Apple are hating like the devil holy water. Smart people are ending all these dependencies by switching to a 100% open source environment. I did it 3 years ago and I am perfectly happy with that.
Dwayne Bozworth
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Dwayne Bozworth,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2012 | 3:14:51 AM
re: Microsoft: 100,000 Windows 8 Apps Coming
You know, a few things in this article seem to make a lot of sense, and making sure software is compatible with new versions is key.

First off, Android decided to name all their software after sweets.
Apple chose big cats for Mac OS 10. (OSX)

Here, I propose that Microsoft, in its infinite wisdom do something similar, but name the products after meat that sizzles. Unfortunately, it seems you can't cook sugary foods, and exotic cats are relatively expensive unless your on safari.

So here's some examples for common folk-

Windows 8 Hamburger
Windows 8 Bratwurst (Bug Fix Servicepack)

Windows 9 Bacon
Windows 9 Turkey (Bug Fix Servicepack)

Windows 10 Sausage
Windows 10 Pork Links (Bug Fix Servicepack)

If there's ever a Servicepack 3, it should be called Prime Rib or maybe something that requires BBQ sauce or Steak Sauce. Windows 8 Pork Rib or Windows 8 Prime Rib, this way, people will know it's real good, and should upgrade, even if it costs a small fee.

The possibilities are endless, I think it could work. Someone has to come up with snazzy names. Might as well be me.


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