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Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
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majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2012 | 12:04:28 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
For the most part I agree with you though your hammer example doesn't match up because in fact most carpenters have replaced their hammers with a fancier tool that took time to learn it is called a nail gun. Like your OS though they would not have replaced it unless it did at least some part of the job better, which it does, though only if you have a lot of nails to drive. If you need to drive only one nail, then you still carry and use a hammer.

As for the ribbon in Office, personally I think it does do the job better. Was there a learning curve yes, but once I had it down I found it easier to use. While I do not spend a large portion of my day in Office I do use it frequently. The question then is when Microsoft puts out a new version of Office do they try to cater to the casual users like you, the intermediate users like me, or the power users. Obviously they are going to cater to the more advanced users because those users will upgrade more often and thereby make more money for the company. In addition as new users come along that have never used the old office, should they be forced to use an old interface just because you donG«÷t want to learn a new one?

The question then for Windows 8 is does it do the job better for casual users, intermediate users, power users, or no one? I think the jury is still out on that. Was the new UI in Windows 8 the best option, I donG«÷t think so but for Microsoft to be able to create and offer fixes for their old products they have to have new products, which support new hardware and new ways of doing things. We can't all just keep using plain old hammers forever.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2012 | 4:31:57 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Yes, we can learn, but for what purpose as a desktop user? To be able to do the same tasks with more clicks and overall reduced productivity and increased aggravation trying to swerve around Metro the whole time?
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2012 | 7:05:07 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Betcha said that about Vista, too....
Prototype
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Prototype,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2012 | 7:02:43 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
I would say, to be practical, it would be totally worth learning a tech that would stay around for a long way into the future. Trust me thats where the whole world is going.
Prototype
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Prototype,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2012 | 6:59:20 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Thank you very much for review. By far the most unbiased and rational review I could find on web.
NJ Mike
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NJ Mike,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2012 | 6:00:19 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Let's get real here. For most of us, the OS is just something that runs our computers so we can do our jobs. It is like a hammer or a saw for a carpenter. Does the hammer drive in nails? Yes. So will a carpenter look to replace it for a fancier tool that will take time to learn? Does Windows XP or Windows 7 run my computer? Yes, so why do I need to replace it? Will learning how to navigate around these tiles make me better at my job? I doubt it. But it will cut into my productivity while I'm learning how to do everything. I'm worried that it will be like that stupid ribbon in Office. I knew where all the commands were that I needed. But for some stupid reason, they changed where these commands are, and how they are accessed. I don't use Office alot with my job, so it is taking me a while to learn to relearn how to do simple things. And when I eventually learn, it will take me just as long to do with the stupid ribbon as with the old menu.

Can't they leave well enough alone?
Johnnythegeek
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Johnnythegeek,
User Rank: Strategist
10/26/2012 | 3:08:42 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Paul is totally a geek and simply has forgotten the average consumers tech challenged mind. My wife is a perfect example of a super smart high IQ person who has already tried Windows 8 and failed. She simply does not want to relearn Windows because Microsoft decided to change it. I bought her a new laptop just because she did not want to deal with Windows 8 in a few months when she really needed a new PC. My wife is not a person who is not up to challenges. She teaches other teachers, she is a very creative person. I think Microsoft and some geeks have way under estimated how much this will affect a average user.
rcpar
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rcpar,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/25/2012 | 10:26:41 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
I couldn't agree more with this article. As a MS partner, I already deployed the OS to three end users. Two of them didn't care becase they were getting newer computers. The other (who was the least savvy) was so thrilled with the "cool" factor of the OS that he learned it just as fast as the other two who were far more computer literate. The doom and gloom critics are full of it.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
10/25/2012 | 2:15:54 PM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
Actually, I believe the Metro UI and Windows 8 are more to reduce costs by having a singular interface (at least most of the coding) across mobile (Windows Phone or tablet) and desktop environments. I would challenge Paul to sit the help desk for a week after a Win8 rollout for a realty check, I think he'd be surprised starting with the "fact" that most office workers using the technology have college degrees and working the rest of the way through the many assumptions in the article. They will definitely work through software upgrades, there is little choice as they like death are the few inevitable realities of life.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
10/25/2012 | 4:59:39 AM
re: Windows 8: You Can Handle The Learning Curve
The comment about "But if you want the classic desktop, just hit the tile that says, wait for it ... Desktop." is very misleading. Yes there is a tile for the desktop but what non-experts really want are the desktop applications. The big problem users will face are multiple ways of doing things. Try finding a picture using the ModernUI on a network mapped drive. Try explaining to a senior accountant that they use file manager to find the pdf file but when they double-click on it and the ModernUI pdf reader comes up they can't use the file manager any more.

heck, I have users who are just barely learning about alt-tab functionality. Now spending my time explaining that sometimes it works and sometimes you have to swipe down from the invisible upper left corner instead, is a needless waste of time.

I think Win8 will be a tough sell for many companies at least for awhile yet.
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