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Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
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DumbPhoneUser
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DumbPhoneUser,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:57:20 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
As far as sales of iPad over Surface (or any keyboard-enabled tablet), people do not YET realize how annoying and limiting a tablet is until they have to live with it a while. There is MAJOR TABLET ENVY rampant in the world today driving purchasing. Get used to seeing a lot more <5 - word emails (would not be all bad). Famously, Steve Jobs was once overheard at a trade show insisting you "do not need color on a PC monitor" - the Mac (Toaster-sized all in one) had just launched. It was B&W (ie monochrome). Fast forward - "tablets smaller than the iPad1 will be DOA" (again, Steve Jobs) ... next, the iPad Mini. Fast forward ... iPads and other tablets are abandoned as users reject 'thumb-typing' mechanics for a familiar, productive QWERTY experience. These things don't happen? Why are there NO Game Console touchscreen controllers? Look at the Flip Phone. Look at the first smartphones (ie iPhone 3 - where is the Note? The Galaxy III? How do they differ? The Nokia 920? The single-button mouse? DOS 5.0?)
DumbPhoneUser
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DumbPhoneUser,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:45:16 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I remember being taught how to use a mouse on a scroll bar. In 1991, I had to teach 25 salespeople with million-dollar quotas in a software company HOW TO DOUBLE-CLICK so they could use their brand-new Windows 3.0 PCs. It took me months to learn that the iPad 'Press and Hold' was a different dynamic than 'Tap' ... I never heard of 'swiping' before ... now I own three touch-screen devices ... and then they put 12 strangers in a room and cannot figure out why they cannot look like rock stars instantly on a new OS? Shezz.
MRODGERS000
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MRODGERS000,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:40:01 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
It is amazing to me how the press has pushed this style of operating system and now.....they wonder why it doesn't sell. I agree with MoonWatcher. I don't need a smart phone experience on a desktop PC. I use a PC to read emails, work on spreadsheets, play games, etc. I think MicroSoft is fixing a problem that only existed in the minds of journalists. I never asked for a small screen experience on a desktop.
Greg50111
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Greg50111,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:31:47 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
It is ludicrous to expect businesses to purchase touchscreens for their employees. Can you picture a suite full of employees leaning over their desks to swipe this way and that? I cannot imagine myself sitting about 2 1/2 feet away from my monitor, reaching over my desk to constantly swipe at the display.

I would guess that within a very short time I would have arm cramps and back aches.

It is a horrible UI and an insult to desktop users. My PC is not a toy for running apps. It is a workstation for running applications.
jreuter809
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jreuter809,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:27:06 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I don't want Windows Classic, I just want Windows 8 with all the great improvements it does have (boot time, system restore, etc.) but with the regular start menu interace for my desktop use. Save the interface formerly known as metro for tablets, thanks. On my desktop I prefer a Windows that actually does windows for all my applications, not just 'legacy' ones.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
11/27/2012 | 7:24:52 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I have to agree with jimbo0117 on this in that 3 weeks for an OS is different than a comparable 3 weeks for any other "software" package. Remember there is still an economic situation that is not permitting as many to buy new hardware just for the OS as perhaps in the past. You were correct in highlighting the differences in IE operation is one of the primary detractions in my opinion. The other would be the vendor support. For example, I had recently bought an HP and upgraded to the Win8 only because it cost less than a lunch to do so. After the upgrade, I had to go to HPs website to download drivers as the installation did not contain the latest drivers available and found most of the HP branded software was not available for download (only the most critical HW drivers are). It will not matter to most who do not like the vendor software anyway, but it may indicate the lack of commitment of these vendors to the new OS or it could simply reflect on HPs current identity crisis. But if others do not produce Win8 compatible software/apps in the short term, it could be an issue.

In short, in going through the criticisms I see a lot that will be there anyway (criticizing is a favored pasttime), Win8 is following the standard software development strategy of recent times used by all (get it on the market and then perfect it through subsequent releases or phased implementations), and comparing it to the old is a futile exercise (it was meant to be new with new methods and appearance). Considering it seems more than anything else an effort to develop a standardized cross platform user experience (desktop, tablet, phone) and reduce MS development costs, I accept a few quirks on the desktop platform (if we believe the future of computing will transfer to mobile devices and cloud services).
gfish66
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gfish66,
User Rank: Strategist
11/27/2012 | 7:19:49 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I hate the whole concept of Windows 8's ridiculous interface being foisted upon corporate desktop users and even into the server products. I have Software Assurance, so I already own the licenses, but I wish there was some way I could show MS that I have not and will not deploy Windows 8 or Server 2012 in their current form, as a matter of protest. If I deployed these at my company, management would probably fire me.

I had Windows phones for years, and truth be told, they were pretty bad. Zero innovation. When Android phones came along, I bought one and never looked back. No way I'm going back.

Windows 8 looks like a dumbed-down version of Windows 2.x. When Microsoft stops innovating, and instead chases the likes of Apple and Google, it's never good. I don't know what is wrong with those people in Redmond. Get a clue.
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Ninja
11/27/2012 | 7:18:23 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I don't think they will ditch metro completely, they need it for tablets and phones, but they may ditch it for desktops and laptops.
SD.Jason
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SD.Jason,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:12:08 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
My own feeling (and from a consumer standpoint) is that the "fizzle" is heavily related to Microsoft's marketing fumble, and not as much to do with Windows 8 itself. The fumble and its contribution to the fizzle was completely avoidable, or should have been. I think it was a grave mistake to for Microsoft to showcase the Surface this summer as they did, which, in my own mind, became the specific poster child for Windows 8 itself, and then only release the limited-capability "lite" version of the Surface at the time of the Windows 8 debut. while at the same time promising something even bigger and better "very soon to come." This future promise (along with the poster-child association with Windows 8) is what I think has helped to derail the immediate interest while dramatically reinforcing a natural "wait and see" approach. Something now (unnecessarily) feels half-baked because the "real" Windows 8 Poster Child has yet to hit the scene. No sober person would dare to expect robust success in the consumer market with that sort of debut strategy. Had the Surface Pro come out simultaneously with the debut of Windows 8, I think the general level of enthusiasm (and sales) would have been higher and the spotlight on the Surface *and* Windows 8 much brighter. This delayed arrival of the poster child also casts an avoidable shadow on the debut of the Surface running Windows RT - the spotlight, in minds like mine, is still pointing offstage while the current Surface is already on stage and standing in the dark. So rather than offering the RT Surface as a customer's strategic choice, instead it seems like an all-you-can-get-for-now imposter of the real thing. That is a shame - it has its own independent merits, but I'm too distracted by my anticipation of Surface Pro to really care - I can't evaluate their different benefits side by side and choose; I'm still left "waiting." That's a terrible notion to associate with Windows 8. In the end, I feel that the way I perceived Microsoft's hype of the Surface and Windows 8 has left me still waiting for the true "star of the show" to come out on stage (or even arrive into town). The whole debut strategy, as it has turned out in the end, seems a bit like hanging Elvis's jumpsuit on stage while promising that Elvis himself is going to show up in a couple *months* to perform an entirely new, exciting show as the start of a miraculous comeback tour, but... in the meantime, please enjoy our cover band wearing a low-grade jumpsuit imitation. Seriously?! Who's going to care about the cover band or Elvis's jumpsuit with that sort of approach? No wonder there were resignations involved.
Dillon!
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Dillon!,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2012 | 7:11:10 PM
re: Windows 8 Fizzling, Time For Windows Classic?
I'm not in total agreeance on this article. Yes there are two different ways of doing things in each version but everyone already knows the "classic" way; and learning the new way (with the option to use the classic way while learning) isn't as difficult as everyone having to learn Android (which changes slightly in every version released) or IPad.

The real problem is they jumped into the game too late against Android and IPad and now that people are more attracted to those two because of their apps, "coolness" and ease of use, they're having a harder time competing.
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