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5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
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yegurakakuru
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yegurakakuru,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 9:03:56 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
"what MS is doing by trying to unify everything under 1 OS"

Actually, that's what they're saying, but unfortunately, not what they're doing. Think about it: from a consumer's perspective, you have Win7 and Win7 Phone. For Win8, now there are three OS-es: Pro, RT and Phone. This is not 'unifying' in my book, it's actually fragmentation. And it only confuses customers even more.

I use Win8 on a non-touchscreen PC and I'm pretty happy with it. Thing is though that Metro is completely useless on a non-touch system and the desktop mode is equally useless on a RT tablet. If you use Win8 just as you have used Win7, it's OK, even a bit faster. But Metro is really an annoyance and MS should give users the option to disable it. Apparently MS is trying to play Apple's game and expect to win it. They won't. Look at the prices they came up with for the Surface! They're not in touch with the reality anymore.
KeepingThingsSane
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KeepingThingsSane,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 8:00:52 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
You continue to prove my point. And the 1 OS concept is not original.
KeepingThingsSane
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KeepingThingsSane,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:58:01 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
All the evidence points to Jabberwolf being a Wintard. The reality is, each new system that appears on the market will have its fans and its haters. So what? Who gives a crap apart from the vendors and any business that aims to make money from these platforms? As long as the latest bit of hardware and/or software helps users, even empowers them, to achieve what they need to achieve, the back and forth sniping that Jabberwolf appears to advocate, is pointless, even juvenile.

It is OK to criticize subjects of news stories, but verbal/written attacks on "...tards" is something I would expect from a four year-old. Oh, and full disclosure here - I use both Windows and Mac systems daily.
GoneToPlaid
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GoneToPlaid,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:56:48 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I will ask the one question which nobody, in any online article or review of Windows 8, seems to have asked: Why didn't Microsoft, when developing Windows 8, split the interface development into two nodes -- one node with the specific focus on reviving the home and business PC markets, and another node with the specific focus of gaining a substantial share of the tablet market? Instead, Microsoft entirely focused on the tablet market while providing PC compatibility as a poorly implemented afterthought.

Amazingly, the new Windows 8 OS isn't smart enough, upon installation or booting, to automatically use the touch screen interface if a touch screen display is detected, or to automatically use a more conventional mouse/keyboard and compatible Windows 7-like interface if the OS detects that the hardware does not have a touch screen display. Instead, the default for Windows 8 is to FOLLOW the general appearance of Android and MAC tablet operating systems, further exacerbated by a complete lack of any intiuitve instructions or help popups about how to use this new interface.

A business maxim: Lead, follow, or get out of the way. Following can lead to the latter. Mangling a "follow" attempt definitely will lead to the latter. Sinofsky completely mangled Microsoft's "follow" attempt. There is no other way to describe both the reviews, user experiences and general overall rejection regarding the new Windows 8 operating system. This is borne out by recent ads for new Windows 8 PCs and laptops which are now listed on retailer web sites as "clearance" items with blowout prices. This latter fact, above all else and regardless of Microsoft's reported sales, reveals the true picture of Windows 8. Overall it appears that public acceptance of Windows 8 is even worse than Vista. Nothing is going to change that, just as nothing changed things for Vista.

Microsoft's strategy has completely ignored the existing business world users, experienced users and the general public who still use PCs for a variety of tasks which just aren't suitable to perform on tablets. Microsoft also completely ignored the need to do something which would revive the PC market since that market is related to the aforementioned groups of users. Why didn't Microsoft decide to also focus on the PC market, instead of completely ignoring this market simply because many analysts think that this market might wither and die? When the first PCs were introduced in the early 1980s, many analysts said that PCs were merely a fad and that PCs were nothing but glorified calculators. How wrong they were. Regardless, PC manufacturers were and still are clamoring for a new OS which to revive the PC market segment since they know that PCs, for at least the next couple of years, will continue to outperform tablets. For the time being, tablets just don't have the screen size and workspace, raw processing power, and battery life to complete with high performance PCs.

Over the past months, both the PC industry and online media falsely hyped the Microsoft line that this new operating system would be revolutionary. In particular, both believed Steven Sinofsky's hard court press that this new Windows OS is what consumers really wanted. He was dead wrong, and of course he no longer is with Microsoft.

I recall the similar hard court press tactics which were associated with the pending release of Windows Vista, and I vividly recall the questionable tactics which Microsoft used to force consumers to upgrade to Vista. For the latter and most notably and when Vista's sales figures were very disappointing, Microsoft released IE7. After installing IE7 on an XP machine and when the user tried to use previously installed Win98 and XP programs which relied on two specific DLLs, Windows would report that those programs were trying to use DLLs which supposedly were "Vista only DLLs" and that the user should upgrade to Vista for "improved performance," when in fact the two DLL's in question had been included in all versions of Windows since Windows 95. Installing IE7 actually deleted those existing DLLs from the user's computer, all in Microsoft's effort to try to force users to upgrade to Vista for a better user experience. If an XP user skipped upgrading IE6 to IE7 and instead upgraded IE6 directly to IE8, then these DLL issues did not occur since, by the time IE8 was released, Microsoft had completely given up on trying to force users to upgrade from XP to Vista. Thus IE8's installer was not configured to delete these two installed DLLs since Microsoft by this point had totally given up on Vista.

With the above in mind, let's look at where Windows 8 utterly fails in terms of Microsoft's "assessment" that tablets are the wave of the future. Microsoft's assessment is clouded by Microsoft's desire to make strong inroads into the tablet market, but this rapidly growing market segment is merely one very distinct portion of of the overall industry market. Sinofsky totally missed this crucial point. Instead Sinofsky erroneously thought that the tablet market segment, rapidly growing as it is, is the ONLY computer industry market which Microsoft's new OS should be designed for. In short, Sinofsky completely disregarded the desires of a plethora of PC manufacturers who hoped that the new Windows 8 OS would help to revive the PC market. Sinofsky completely ignored both the home PC market. Most importantly and damnably, Sinofsky with his complete control of the Windows 8 development process, utterly ignored the needs of of one of Microsoft's largest, most important and most loyal customer bases -- the business market. This, in short, is Sinofsky's most striking and abysmal failure. No wonder he "left" the company on such short (one day) notice.
NPCO
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NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:47:02 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Exactly. Metro should be just like Media Center has been (up until Windows 8) - an optional install that someone can choose, or choose not, to use. Heck, even make it installed by default, but give the user an option to default to it or the traditional desktop, and even an easy way to switch the default and/or run one temporarily even if the default is set to the other.

In other words, give the user the ability to determine for themselves which UI best serves their needs overall, or in each particular use scenario. Continually forcing the use of a UI ill-suited to one's particular and personal workflow only leads to resentment. By doing this, Microsoft is undermining what is by all other measures a very nice OS.

All that having been said, $5 solves all these problems in the form of Start 8. Your start menu is back, even more configurable than it's ever been and you have to option to disable (or not) the various gestures that invoke the Metro UI. With Metro entirely disabled, you essentially have what people are asking for - Classic Windows with all the benefits of 8. With none (or not all) of Metro disabled, you have the best of both worlds. Personally, I have all the corners disabled and I boot directly to the desktop. If I want Metro, I just hit the Windows key on my keyboard - I get to use it when *I* choose and for the purposes *I* find it's useful for, otherwise it stays out of my way.

Had Microsoft built in these few trivially minor features, they'd have avoided all the backlash and bad press they've received. It's honestly as simply as that.

jabberwolf
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jabberwolf,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:44:53 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
There is no koolaid aside from the itards that seem to be hypocritical about it. People who use OSes and devices look for function - thats it. And Win8 is VERY functional and much more so that having 2 devices, 2 Oses, and 2 ecosystems.

I actually was thinking of Android having that functionality but its a bit buggy. I actually LIKE android but its a pain to manage and they dont have the business side (which is about 90% windows). And there is a reason for that: being able to manage endpoints. Now I like Android but its more like a toy OS, with very little to collaborate between programs, very little management, and kinda buggy, - it's devices make a good thin client though. But basically its a toy OS.

"it's about the general issue of Metro apps not working in dekstop and vice versa." This actually shows that you didnt read my comment. Its a 2 mode OS. Thats like asking iOS apps to run on OSX and vice versa which might be a good idea to have on 1 device but their GUI modes would be different.

One app is a desktop (not really made to be run in "touch/tablet" mode.) The other app is made to run on a desktop mode. But its the DEVELOPER that must make those changes, not MS. Saying otherwise is kinda, well, dumb. You're actually telling MS not to change and to have NO OPTION and to pick one or the other. They give you BOTH. Now in saying that, saying that not having a choice - is a good thing, is about as stupid as Apple saying having no flash and calling it a "feature".

I can understand MS's move to get developers to create apps for tablet mode but they have the desktop mode for "legacy" apps - and most run quite well. Again you should try it before criticizing it. And seeing as where you like to stick tablets - I dont think you're using them correctly.
aprildyer
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aprildyer,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:39:36 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
You make an excellent point which should be emphasized a hundred times over for every business user: businesses use computers because it helps them to run their business better.

We already have computers that run just fine, they run programs that run our business, and our staff are fully trained to use them to make money for our company.

To have Microsoft release a new interface because it helps Microsoft's business is literally no concern of ours.

To obtain the mostly under-the-hood improvements that Microsoft trumpets with Windows 8 is a complete waste of time and money for us when it means we have to spend our time and our money retraining our staff to do the exact same thing they were doing yesterday, except having to use a different visual interface.

I still remember a wag years ago (perhaps he even wrote for IW) who told the old joke:

Q: Why is Bill Gates billions of dollars richer than you?
A: Because you pay him a hundred dollars for his product, and then he steals a thousand dollars of your time.
NPCO
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NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:31:55 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
And I'm still amazed at the absolute blind allegiance some consumers have to what's in the best interest of an impersonal corporation.

We've had preview versions of Windows 8 in it's current form for the better part of a year. To suggest anyone hasn't had enough time with the OS to "get" what Microsoft is doing is both patently absurd and dishonest.

Second, who's to say that what Microsoft is trying to do, or the way they're going about it, is actually a practical, feasible and overall good thing to be doing? One OS... fine. One login... fine. One ecosystem... fine. But please explain how different UI's optimized for different devices and the entirely different tasks those devices facilitate is a necessary part of the one OS, one login, one ecosystem goal? All Microsoft would need to do it offer an option on install or first boot - Which UI would you like to default to, Classic Windows or Windows 8 Store App UI (the chaos surrounding the very naming and renaming of Metro should make it obvious that their strategy hasn't been well thought out).

And don't tell me people would be confused by having to choose a default, as they do it with browsers all the time - install any browser and the first time it's run, it asks if the user would like to make it the default. And I wouldn't even care if Metro was always installed and available... just give the user the preference of which UI they'd like to use.

The very idea that people would be confused by different UI's across different devices is absurd - they've had no trouble integrating iOS and Android devices into their lives, so why would Microsoft think people would self destruct when faced with one UI for desktop Windows and another for tablet Windows?

The truth is that they wouldn't, and Microsoft knows this. The forcing of Metro on the desktop is for one, and only one, purpose - to expose people into learning it's phone/tablet UI in the hopes that they'll go on to choose a Windows tablet or phone over iOS or Android. Well, Microsoft's Phone OS has been on the market for a sufficient amount of time to determine that the majority of people simply don't care for it. Instead of Microsoft working to figure out how to better interest the consumer, they've essentially said "No, you **WILL** use our software, whether you want to or not".

And finally, I'm not one of these sheeple people of which you speak. I've been using Windows 8 since the developer preview, I've upgraded 3 of my systems to the retail version and overall I like it very much. But after all this time, I still find Metro an entirely useless and near crippled interface for desktop use.

Microsoft's customers are not like Apple's customers. We don't take kindly to being told how to think, what to do and precisely in what way we may, or may not, use the products we buy.
Jeremy C.
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Jeremy C.,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:14:56 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
"I'm sorry, I've used on in a store" What?! You haven't even used it and you're making these gross generalizations?! While i agree with many of the authors points. I definitely don't agree with with any of yours due to that comment. You haven't even used the OS man. I use it daily on my laptop. I triple boot nix Mint/ Win7/Win8. Win8 is my OS of choice,its incredibly fast, its got native .iso and html5 support, the registry is more consolidated. Once you take an hour an learn metro its quite fun and efficient. I just really think people need to sit down and try the OS before they start spewing all this hate about something they clearly have no idea about.

ANON1252430315558
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ANON1252430315558,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:07:39 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Or they could just sell the company and give all the money back to the stockholders.
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