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5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
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bigness1970
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bigness1970,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 8:16:33 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I had stated these exact concerns on another website. Microsoft took a bad gamble and are going to lose a bundle on this one. I had beta tested the windows 8 os for a year. And like many other beta testers, we expressed our concerns over the ease of use and lack of being consumer friendly. To put a $900+ price tag on a system that will have a laundry list of problems as each of their other os had in the past, and on new hardware that is untested by consumers, is just bad business. I look forward to see which CEOs will be fired for this one.

Their best bet would have been to put out a $300 tablet to allow people to play with and get a feel for it, then put out a pricier tablet. The ipad was only $580 when it first hit the market...and the economy was better. What will be interesting is watching MSF stock plunge within the next year.
BobbyDeeJr
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BobbyDeeJr,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 8:04:13 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I had a post on here that got deleted for some reason--
same issue -Autocad user here..
Windows 8 is not fit for anyone doing anything related to actual computer performance...
JymW
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JymW,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 8:00:26 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Microsoft should be giving customers what they want instead of trying to force them to use something that looks foreign to them, results in confusion, and disables things they are used to using. Visible changes, if any, should be incremental.

What customers really want is a beefed up, more secure, faster, and smaller footprint of Windows XP. What beefed up means is additional features integrated into the system but with the same basic interface. Windows 7 might have been a feeble attempt to do this but it is bloated.

Virtually any small office I go into that is using Windows is using XP. It is stable, relatively easy to use, supports many generations of Apps, and is something they are used to.

So despite what Microsoft threatens about end of life for XP, customers will either stay with it, maybe upgrade to 7, or switch to Mac. Windows 8 it just a bad idea, especially if their customers continually try to avoid it instead of embracing it. Some one once said that you can force a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. The same can be said for Windows 8.

Steve Balmer should be commended for doing such a great job of marketing Apple's products for them, considering his decision making for Microsoft.
snappy
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snappy,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 7:55:21 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
My monitor went out on my laptop and rather than repair it, I made the mistake of buying a new laptop with Windows 8. I was totally not prepared for how it basically just took over my Hotmail account; that was just the first annoyance. The OS is a pain in the neck and I returned the laptop as a result and instead bought one with Windows 7 already on it; no Windows 8. I NEVER want to deal with 8 again! Frustrating the way the apps slide around on the page without my touching a thing. If I want a tablet I'll buy an ipad; I don't need a combination laptop OS and tablet.
Guy95
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Guy95,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 6:35:32 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
There are 3 good reasons to buy Windows 8.

If none of these apply to you then there's no point to spend any more money for it.

1. Touch - this doesn't apply to me, I HATE smudges on my screen.

2. Apps - this is the way the world is going, if you have any need or interest in keeping up with it you are going to have to get on board.

3. Evolutionary improvements in the underlying OS - for me this is most apparent in performance/efficiency, to achieve this they sacrificed some glitz. I expect for all the work they did there is other good stuff in there too, hopefully including stability and security.
Guy95
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Guy95,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 6:15:00 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
No, you don't have to do that.

Don't you have a power button on your PC ?

If that's too hard, all you have to do is drag your mouse alllllll the way over to the right corner, instead of alllllll the way over to the left in Win7...

then click Settings, instead of Start (remember how many people screamed about having to hit Start to shutdown?)...

then click Power instead of Shutdown and choose your option as before.

It's not harder, duh.

Oh, if you are a shortcut junky like me, just hit ctrl-alt-del and click the power icon.
johnjoedan
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johnjoedan,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 5:52:55 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
As the Director of Technology of a small school district....my first concern is a device I can manage either through Altiris or even better perhaps an MDM like Meraki's. The RT does not appear to play well with either. The pro version shows promise.
Then PRICE/PRICE/PRICE... the current pricing reminds me that Microsoft is not necessarily my friend. The current pricing encourages me to move as quickly as I can to a Droid device that we can manage with an MDM and which will work with our active directory structure. And, for which there are about 500,000 current apps.
Also quite putting out that the screen resolution must be 1366x768...(note that that allows all features) when only a 1024x768 is actually required to run.

I have actually liked the system but to be the go to system for a school system (hook users like Google Apps have) or a small business then PRICE must come down to actually compete with the iPad or more importantly the very good Droid tablets. I don't need a top of the line system and device with Office7 or Office13 installed, just a solid and affordable system running on a quality tablet like the Acer W510 series.
vince8
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vince8,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 4:24:55 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
You hit the nail on the head. I looked really hard for a reason to upgrade to win8. I could not come up with even one halfway decent reson to do so. If MS implements your suggestions, I might have one.
mcg001
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mcg001,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 4:16:58 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I once owned a Triumph Trophy 500. You could drive it on the freeway and you could drive it on the trails. It wasn't the best at either, but for a person who didn't know just where they might be riding, I guess it was the right bike. So, my point being: why did Microsoft spend so much to build a dual platform that sounds like it is not really doing much for either the road or the trail? How is it that the author can spot these issues and the MSFT executives cannot? Is Microsoft the next old GM?
doggarn
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doggarn,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2012 | 2:42:42 AM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Well, I use Autocad Civil 3D for my work, and it seem that Autodesk must have an issue with Microsoft windows 8. None of the programs I use ( 2011) version work in any kind of mood, I'm not sure who to be mad at... Of my most recent experience with window 8 was on a workstation is that besides my autocad issues it seems to work, but I never use anything but desktop to do my work. So, for business application that I make my living on Windows 8 Pro is useless. I'm pointing fingers that both are acting like Replubicans and Democrats and the viscal cliff.... so now I can't work on a OS that I want to, but can't.... their is a proverb in this somewhere....

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