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Dell's 'Transformation': Customers Speak
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moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2013 | 12:04:44 PM
re: Dell's 'Transformation': Customers Speak
Based on their enterprise desktop hardware alone Dell is still a 3rd tier hardware manufacturer. Shoddy quality for mediocre product that is hopelessly overpriced. IT tells me that things like an external 2TB hard drive are not possible because Dell charges close to 300 bucks for it. Every online retailer with better service than Dell sells it for a third. New systems for 1200 bucks are so bad that I am tempted to spend my own money for the Walmart-Special for 250$ that dances circles around the Dell junk.
If Dell wants to stay relevant they need to improve quality and charge businesses reasonable prices.Both will work because Dell won't have to deal with the massive amounts in returns. About half the stuff we get from Dell dies within six months. Not only is that a cost to Dell, but a noticeable cost to our company.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
12/17/2012 | 10:15:03 PM
re: Dell's 'Transformation': Customers Speak
That's their customers, who, one would think would be pretty satisfied. It would be more interesting to ask companies who are not their customers, why they are not, and to ask those who were, why they are no longer.

This was pretty much a puff piece.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
12/17/2012 | 10:02:40 PM
re: Dell's 'Transformation': Customers Speak
Dell has moved in the direction of supplying some of the IT for companies that don't have or don't want large IT departments, having started out as just a hardware supplier. To continue down this path, it will need to become more of a software company, with software initiatives rivaling hardware. That's been a tricky act for other companies to pull off. But Dell's hardware is "industry standard," without the bound up pride of invention that remains part of IBM and was part of Sun Microsystems. Dell has the potential -- and shows some of the determination needed -- to create a successful software unit. Charlie Babcock, InformationWeek


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