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Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
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PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/6/2013 | 12:35:45 AM
re: Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
I would have to stay that without discussing and covering every point you have made then it would not be social media. I would have to agree with Tonic_Writes if you don't want it shared or out there, then don't put it out there. Furthermore if you are going to put it out there then know that you have no control over it once it is out there! Don't cry about your own lack of information and how to handle it.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2013 | 1:39:39 PM
re: Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
I am with you on introducing yourself in LinkedIn invitations, etc. Often, I'll get an invitation to connect from someone I vaguely remember but cannot remember how I know him or her. Other times, I'll get an invitation from someone who is a complete stranger looking to network. In these cases, I'd prefer a more personal note saying why he or she wishes to connect; otherwise, there is a chance I may not approve the connection.
Tonic_Writes
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Tonic_Writes,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/28/2012 | 3:44:48 AM
re: Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
Your article very explicitly talked about a tit for tat exchange. I come from a company where there was absolutely unethical behavior, in some cases illegal. Not only will into endorse them no matter how heavily they endorse me, but if I could, I would thumbs down their LinkedIn profiles which are full of lies. Social Media has a place, but it is being overused. To the point that it loses all relevance. I don't have 300 LinkedIn connections. To some people that means I must not be a good employee. When in fact it just means I will not accept invitation from people I could not in good conscience want connected to me professionally. More people need to be like me, not less.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/27/2012 | 10:55:50 PM
re: Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
Thank you for reading and for your comment.

I don't think you should "like" and "recommend" indiscriminately. I have said so in previous stories, but perhaps I should have said so explicitly here. I do believe, however, that effective presence on social media sites requires some active and purposeful participation. If you do like something a friend has posted, hit the like button. If not, don't. If you do feel that a colleague who has endorsed you has done good work, as well, endorse him or her. If you barely know people who are endorsing you or can't in good conscience recommend them, don't.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Tonic_Writes
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Tonic_Writes,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/27/2012 | 8:53:57 PM
re: Social: It's A Matter Of Manners
Total BS. If you don't want something out in the ether, don't share it. That simple. Don't 'like' something a friend posted if you don't agree with it. Don't recommend a completely horrible and unethical co-worker just because they recommended you unasked. This writer basically wants everyone to demean themselves and their beliefs in order to pump up traffic on these sites. And this is exactly why social media is losing relevance.


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