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10 Epic CES Fails
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ANON1246716909709
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ANON1246716909709,
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1/18/2013 | 6:04:50 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
At the risk of sounding pedantic, your use of "dumbsizing" doesn't appear to be consistent with the Oxford dictionary definition - http://oxforddictionaries.com/.... Your usage IS consistent with the slang definition found in the Urban dictionary - http://www.urbandictionary.com.... However, that would conflict your assertion that "...slang is the last refuge of the inarticulate!", unless your intent was to appear inarticulate, which seems unlikely. The use of "inarticulate" (an adjective) as the object of the preposition "to" would also be rejected by some language purists. Finally, you may be "oversensitive", or "overly sensitive" about corruption of the English language, but according to Oxford, you can't be "over-sensitive". I, too, worked hard to learn English grammar as part of my public education (and continue to struggle with innappropriate hyphenation.) I understood the meaning behind his use of the word "fails", but didn't sense any intent on his part to "...decry the decline in public education standards." If that was his goal, then the article WAS an epic fail.
SFBill
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SFBill,
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1/18/2013 | 4:15:04 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
There weren't 100 tablets at CES 2009, or 2010... Apple didn't launch iPad until April 2010 and there were only two companies showing Android "tablets" at CES in 2009. Google decided to focus on penetrating the smartphone business before turning attention to tablets, so even those were products of open-source Android. In 2011, there were 100 tablets - follow your link...

But you are right, Apple made the tablet market, and they are the tablet market for the most part (right now), but the open strategy is a longer-term bet, so don't be shocked to see the (Android-based) Kindle Fires of the world dominate within 5 years.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
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1/7/2013 | 3:01:25 AM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
You mention the Microsoft Watch (which I'd personally never heard of, and for probably a very good reason)... but have you ever seen the Casio watch that interfaced with a PC running Outlook and transferred data via a series of screen flashes? Friend of mine had one in the mid-90s and it was actually pretty trick - but all of that functionality (and the need for it) is gone with everyone carrying a smartphone now.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
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1/7/2013 | 2:58:37 AM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
As a former webOS device owner - the OS was great, the accompanying hardware was subpar and simply couldn't handle daily use... then there was the fact that things were promised when webOS was delivered that never got to see the light of day followed by HP's total about face on the whole thing after sinking money into the purchase of Palm.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
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1/7/2013 | 2:56:22 AM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
iPhone vs Android and iPad vs. Android proves that Microsoft's lost the phone and tablet markets...
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2013 | 2:30:30 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
Wrong is that WebOS is a failure. Yes, it is in the digital dustbin now, but the reason for that is total ineptitude of HP's management and not that WebOS is a bad product. In fact, it is probably the most intuitive and easiest to use mobile OS currently available.
Wolfgang
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Wolfgang,
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1/5/2013 | 12:52:18 AM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
Thanks for getting back to me. I agree that language needs to evolve. That's why all languages have gotten "bigger" over time. However, there's a difference between introducing new words to reflect new realities and perverting existing words to follow the latest slang. Let's remember that slang is the last refuge of the inarticulate! The purpose of language is to communicate. If I introduce a new word that makes my meaning clearer, I have contributed to the evolution of the language. I understand that acronyms like LOL have become acceptable because modern devices like smartphones make it impossible to type, so we abbreviate where we can. Fair enough.

What I don't understand is why journalists feel the need to stoop to the lowest common denominator when it comes to language and yet decry the decline in public education standards. Proper writing, even in such a prosaic field as IT, can elevate the level of discourse and bring a certain "je ne sais quoi" to the proceedings, which is why I sent a note in the first place. Eric Lundquist is an insightful commentator and that it is why I had to vent my spleen about the ongoing mangling of the English language. By the way, English is not my first language, so perhaps I'm over-sensitive about the corruption of something I worked pretty hard to learn.
Tom LaSusa
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Tom LaSusa,
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1/4/2013 | 9:09:48 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
Wolfgang,

Thanks for your thoughts. Personally I've always been of the mind that language -- and words -- should be constantly evolving. Granted, there's some words that should fade into blissful obscurity ("YOLO" anyone?), but referring to something as a 'fail' has been readily accepted by many as a popular slang term.

After all if languages didn't evolve we probably wouldn't be having this conversation LOL! (And yes, I used the LOL on purpose) ;-)

Cheers,
Tom LaSusa
InformationWeek Community Manager
EricLundquist
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EricLundquist,
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1/4/2013 | 7:39:50 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
http://oxforddictionaries.com/...
verb or noun depending on usage. Sorry Wolfgang, you made a fail on this comment
Wolfgang
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Wolfgang,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2013 | 7:29:26 PM
re: 10 Epic CES Fails
Could you please stop butchering the English language? Fails is a verb, not a noun. Are you too lazy to type the extra few letters to spell "failures"? Journalists (and I use the term reluctantly) in the IT sector are guilty of dumbsizing the language in the mindless pursuit of "coolness" by copying each other's latest syntactical and grammatical perversions. Since when is "spend" a noun? When did budget, investment, or expenditure become inadequate?

From the time that some stoned idiot yelled "let's party!" journalists have played fast and loose with the rules of proper communication and turned nouns into verbs. I know that I speak for only a miniscule portion of your readership but, to me, sloppy writing is a sign of sloppy thinking; therefore, I almost automatically avoid any article written by someone who adopts the linguistic level of a reality TV show.
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