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Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
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Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2013 | 4:04:56 AM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
That may be true (about the 2 years behind) for smaller businesses - I did my first Win7 migration in mid-2010 and was working on a contract for another Win7 migration for the first 4+ months of 2012 at a Fortune 500 pharmaceutical company.

The problem with the logic here - why do the same thing twice - is what's in the enterprise application portfolio? When you have over 16,000 applications floating around in a 5,000 user enterprise and just over 50% of them are compatible with Windows 7... you have a serious problem. Organizations have to go through and either internally certify that their apps work on the new platform, or wait for their software provider to recode and recertify for the new platform. Not everyone slaps a copy of Office on top of Windows and calls it good.

Who knows, maybe Microsoft needs the expected influx in revenue to cover the Windows Phone 8 thing... or build up some cash for their involvement with Dell.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
jimbo0117
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jimbo0117,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2013 | 9:31:14 PM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
I'm not sure why this is so surprising. Microsoft advertised the bargain basement upgrade price as short term from the beginning.

Just something else that the MS haters will try to blow our of proportion.
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2013 | 9:17:05 PM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
If you are just now starting a Win 7 rollout, you are about 2 years behind. Just skip from XP to Windows 8. Why do the same think twice?
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2013 | 9:16:05 PM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
The equipment you are touting is OK for a consumer, but not going to cut it with a business user, or a home user needing access to the corporate network (you wont get support from your IT staff). Get a new real PC or laptop with Windows 8 and learn how to use it...it is really very easy and not difficult to transition if you stop listening to the pundits spewing their crap. I still like Win 7 and XP, but have put them to rest at home and will do the same at work in the next 60 days.
PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/21/2013 | 11:58:15 PM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
That is crazy, Microsoft really doesnGÇÖt want those old systems out there anymore uh? I know several organizations that have just hit dates for implementing Windows 7 still. I run Windows 8 on my Mac for those specific applications and tools that I use that are not available through my mac. I can tell you this if I had to pay $200 for Windows 8 I would not be running Windows 8.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
ggiese87101
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ggiese87101,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/21/2013 | 2:21:53 AM
re: Microsoft Jacks Up Windows 8 Upgrade Prices
Just because they raise their prices to Apple-like levels doesn't mean anyone is suddenly going to want their OS more, even with "good momentum". Microsoft, you're going the wrong way, and pricing yourself out of the market. The good old days are gone, get with the new program. Do you realize I can now buy an Android 4.x MiniPC w/HDMI and a 20" display (or just use it on my HDTV) on Amazon for the same price as a "as of Feb 1" Windows 8 upgrade? Or I could get a ChromeBox with ChromeOS for $99 (once it's back in stock). Both of them let me write documents, do spreadsheets and presentations, browse the web, manage and edit pictures/videos, and play games. What would that Windows 8 "upgrade" do for me, other than attempt to get me to spend money on Metro (er, "Modern") apps? Microsoft, I have no clue why you want me to buy Windows 8, much less a Windows 8 upgrade, other than to make you more money. What's in it for me? Or (this being Information Week, you know) for my business? I don't see any ROI when there's so many other good choices out there (including older Windows versions), and the other guys are getting better, faster. Microsoft, I recommend you make your OS a "loss leader" in order to get your market share back (oh, you didn't realize you've lost a bunch and about to your own "fiscal cliff"? ouch) and take a cut of the pie in the apps department. Hmm, that would mean making apps that matter, other than Office (you want me to spend HOW MUCH on Office? Argh!). <sigh> At least you haven't messed up Xbox (yet)...</sigh>


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