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We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
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MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
1/25/2013 | 11:18:43 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
All nation-states have their method of funding (Somalia included probably) and creation of laws depending on their form of government. But whether it is government or private industry there should be one common expectation - quality. It must work or be reparable, delivering a non functional service with little or no expectation to fix its shortcomings is asking for criticism. Development inherently implies acceptance of setbacks (failures if you prefer) but they should be kept in a sandbox environment to the maximum extent possible with an action plan to address the unanticipated. As Mr. Feldman stated the "slow, lumbering, and unresponsive" should change. A starting point might be changing the mindset of those who first evaluate a project from "how can we avoid this" and to a "how can we do this." Without getting into a long explanation of personal history, it comes from close, extensive experience.
jyalai
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jyalai,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/24/2013 | 9:19:16 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
I work for our IT department in my city. You could say our slogan is "Get the job done!" We are not bound by many policies and standards to get it done. We work hard on delivering what the users are asking for. I believe we run into our own problems, because we do not have a big picture approach. We have systems teams making changes to the data center that affect a multiple number of applications without forethought or due diligence to make sure it doesn't cause problems. We then spend an inordinate amount of crisis time fixing the situation. We do a lot of software development that is never used, because we did not help the user think through how the software fit in the big picture. Our IT is not necessarily always to blame. Our users demand everything ASAP putting a lot of pressure on the teams to get stuff out. However, a little reflection, standardizing processes, and communication go a long way.
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/24/2013 | 6:13:29 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
Startups have to earn the trust of investors and customers to get anywhere. In government the investors and customers are the public at large. There has to be more widespread effort to educate the public about the benefits that technological innovation are already bringing to government and how it functions. Without that education I doubt that the public will ever trust government IT enough to fail with their tax dollars. There's simply too much distrust of government right now to expect the public will go along with any government project that might fail. And that is very unfortunate because with worldwide urbanization, government IT is going to have become much more innovative and agile.
jfeldman
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jfeldman,
User Rank: Strategist
1/24/2013 | 5:59:21 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
I'll take a portfolio of "startup" operations (the equivalent of a portfolio of "experiments" in an IT organization) over a blue chip any day. Yes, some of them will fail, but it beats wallowing in mediocrity.
Deirdre Blake
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Deirdre Blake,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2013 | 11:57:47 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
True fact of nature: Put the word "government" in any headline, even in an IT publication, even in the context of improving efficiency, and you will draw "viscious" comments.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/23/2013 | 11:50:26 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
"We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup" -- Given the statistics on startups, that means going out of business.
lgarey@techweb.com
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lgarey@techweb.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2013 | 10:56:53 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
I recently read somewhere that if you want to live without all that pesky governance and regulation, try Somalia. It's fashionable to bash government, but rule of law doesn't happen by itself. Taxes are the cost of living in a civil society. We should be ashamed of forcing government employees to be in a bunker mentality. Lorna Garey
Mike_Acker
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Mike_Acker,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2013 | 12:50:52 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
=" Most government entities are simply publishing information; they're not engaging in discussions with constituents."

"we must run government "

yep, we need to reduce the cost-burden that government imposes on us in taxes, inflation, and debilitating regulations . but read G Edward Griffin: The Creature from Jekyl Island . ad the end, Mr. Griffin admonishes us "the cabal will not give up without a viscious fight". he ain't kidding .
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2013 | 4:25:25 AM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
Interesting that the State of Massachusetts follows the Federal Government's lead and ends up with a public relations black eye from it.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
jfeldman
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jfeldman,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2013 | 10:38:43 PM
re: We Must Run Government IT Like A Startup
Ha, I'm afraid the "Government Fear Factor" is alive and well. But folks in government need to kind of push past it. AND, if we want innovative government, we need to tell gov employees that SOME degree of failure IS an option. My favorite Eric Ries line on this topic: "Telling someone that failure is not an option is an invitation for them to lie to you." More on that, here. http://www.informationweek.com...
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