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Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
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lgarey@techweb.com
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lgarey@techweb.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2013 | 4:14:44 PM
re: Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
This plan also seems like a perfect formula for keeping the best and brightest people engaged. Although, do you think that the mindset of failing fast is anathema to a typical, experienced IT professional? These people tend to be risk-averse by nature, and for good reason, right? Lorna Garey, IW Reports (reports.informationweek.com)
lgarey@techweb.com
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lgarey@techweb.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2013 | 5:06:44 PM
re: Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
On a personnel basis, this culture sounds like a recipe for retaining the best talent, but it also seems to contradict the image of IT pros (esp. in government) as by nature conservative and risk-averse. Do you see that as a limiter? Lorna Garey, IW Reports
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2013 | 5:14:05 PM
re: Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
I amused by the Lean Startup movement in big corporations because I'm wondering just how much leaner these execs think they can get after the last 5 years of belt tightening. The Fortune 500 are collectively so lean already that they've learned to live without millions of jobs that will never be coming back even as the economy continues to improve. I'm all for efficiency and improving shareholder value, but it seems like companies have moved well past just wringing needless waste out of their systems to opportunistically taking advantage of a favorable (to the employer) labor market by squeezing more and more work out of each employee for the same pay. To wit, compare macroeconomic gains in productivity over the past decade with real (inflation adjusted) wages. For decades the two tracked: higher productivity = higher wages, but not lately.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/28/2013 | 6:26:15 PM
re: Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
"Experiment with some of those activities; continue the regular bureaucracy with the other activities." I have heard this line of related advice from several CIOs: Don't just let the cool kids play with the fun stuff. Give everyone a chance with the experiments. Does anyone have advice to share on how to pull that off?
Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
ctsmithiii
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ctsmithiii,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2013 | 7:24:08 PM
re: Startup Culture And Innovation, Defended
Great points Jonathan. We learn through failure. Make mistakes early and often, just don't make the same mistakes twice.


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