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How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
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mojohand
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mojohand,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 5:54:59 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
It is disgusting the ease with which you recommend that companies intrude upon their employee's personal time to provide uncompensated marketing labor.

But I do appreciate that your thumbnail has provided an image to to forever associate with the phrase 'corporate lick-spittle.'

Sincerely,

David Blumgart
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 7:50:47 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
Few people I know in the corporate world work 9 to 5, especially with ubiquitous mobile devices and Internet access. And that goes both ways, as I think about the number of businesspeople I see at afternoon soccer games, with one eye on their smartphones.

However companies handle the balance, real-time engagement with customers will increasingly be something companies have to do in order to stay competitive.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
RW0r1d
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RW0r1d,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 8:21:10 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
Your "corporate world" does not appear to include many warehousemen, line staff, POS staff, laborers, or in short minimum to low wage earners.
Melanie Rodier
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Melanie Rodier,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/20/2013 | 10:39:10 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
True, with companies offering more flexible hours, employees can balance their workload. Employees who are offered a flexible arrangement can promote their brand during work hours, or if they want to, and management agrees, during non-work hours, in the same way that they might decide to complete a work assignment during non-work hours. A flexible social media marketing `policy will obviously not work with per hour workers, minimum wage earners etc, but for salaried workers and open-minded companies it can be a good solution. After all, more people go onto social networks off-hours in general, so it's a win-win: the company can get broader visibility on social media with "off-hour" tweets and the like, and employees can feel empowered by having that kind of flexibility.
RW0r1d
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RW0r1d,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 8:16:13 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
Too many variables on size of companies, employee distribution, etc. to make comments that cannot be logically disputed. It is also clearly in the best interest of the employee to encourage the sale of the products or services which pays their wages. The few comments that can be made may go along the line of: extremely dangerous to imply that an individual's job should be dependant on using their personal social network for work related marketing, line staff and union members would probably not enroll in the ranks of weekend marketers simply on principle which means you are targetting your article to salaried, mid/upper management, my opinion is a separation should be made between social networking (Facebook being principally personal and LinkedIn professionally focused). As more companies are fined for attempting to make access to or using Facebook accounts as terms of employment and more labor cases are presented for unjustified termination, I believe this issue will find its own legal definition.
Truly S.
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Truly S.,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 11:31:06 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
This has to be the most insidious business article I've read in a long time. It should've just been titled "Want to Make Your Employees Work for Free On Their Own Time? Threaten Them with Being Fired If They Don't. Hey, In This Crappy Economy, It'll Work!"
Truly S.
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Truly S.,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2013 | 11:36:04 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
I see no personal gain for the employee, unless the employee is promoting only himself or herself. Otherwise the employer is just getting free work out of the employee. This is as ridiculous as saying that both employers and employees gain when employers hire employees. Well, duh. The employers get work done and the employees get paid. Yes. Well, where's the advantage to the employee to work on his or her own time for no pay, other than to the employer? Yes, the company may get more work, but in the end that will profit the company more than the employee. There's no reason to assume that such work will get the employee a promotion, raise, etc.
SalemWitchesWereInnocent
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SalemWitchesWereInnocent,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/9/2013 | 1:21:08 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
I hope the employees use the social media to loudly tell the world what they think of their company, which forces them to work unpaid in their private time. And then I hope they start contacting their lawyers to arrange for compensation and damages.
RW0r1d
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RW0r1d,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2013 | 2:56:32 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
Granted, engaging in social during the workday helps the employee, but you failed to cite one concrete instance of an employee's social participation resulting in a promotion. I would go so far as to wager that for each case one could cite of a promotion, I could cite a court action either for wrongful termination or slandering the company.
rjones2818
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rjones2818,
User Rank: Strategist
2/12/2013 | 7:28:52 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
8 hours for work, 8 hours for sleep, 8 hours for myself. Period. Management types and their paid shills need to remember this.
jswap
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jswap,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2013 | 11:48:28 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
Yeahhhh, I'm gonna need you to go ahead and tweet about the company on Saturday. And probably Sunday too. Yeahhhhhh, and about those TPS reports...
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2013 | 9:45:15 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
I suspect few companies will mandate this behavior, but many will recognize employees who act as social ambassadors on their off-the-clock time, particularly if they're effective ones. I know Ford's approach is to provide the content that's easy to share on social media, so those who are proud of the company and its cars will find it convenient to share those sentiments on social media. No gun to the head required.
egrobichaud
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egrobichaud,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/14/2013 | 7:23:57 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
As you can see from all the comments, there are too many variables here to make blanket statements. Upper-level salaried workers are different than hourly paid line workers, and more. Big corporate versus smaller local businesses. People in different companies, in different types and sizes of companies, and in different positions will react differently to this article. One can clearly see the different perspectives in the various responses.
PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/15/2013 | 4:08:06 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
There are way to many variables and different type of workers to make a conclusion that would group them all together. Obviously if I own the company I will be more than happy, and most likely be promoting myself through social media after hours. If I am a line worker getting paid an hourly wage, I will probably not be updating my Twitter to feed to announce anything regarding that position or company. That being said the amount of people who access social media at work, while on the clock is gotten out of control and a bit ridiculous. I have read that some people think it is unfair for an employer to ask, I agree, however if I were an employer I would most certainly encourage it after hours. If you are an employee of mine and do not promote our business through social media on your own time, then you had better not be accessing any social feeds when you are on my time.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/20/2013 | 3:37:43 PM
re: How To Encourage Off-The-Clock Social Ambassadors
With tools like HootSuite, social comments by employees that are posted during non-work hours -- such as those to promote content or to market a company's products -- can be easily scheduled during work hours as part of an employee's responsibilities. Social media has changed the way companies do business, including engaging with customers on weekends. It's just the way it is now.


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