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Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
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negi86
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negi86,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 8:40:06 AM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
EvosysG«÷ HCM practice is an experienced team of Oracle practitioners with depth and breadth across the suite of Oracle Human Capital Management modules.

About Evosys: Evosys is an Oracle Partner providing consulting services for implementation and maintenance of Oracle Applications. We are a market-focused, process-centric organization that develops and delivers innovative solutions to our customers, consistently outshining other market players. http://www.evosys.co.in/HumanC...

For any Oracle Service, Business Partnerships, Sales Referrals, Collaborations & Tieups, Please contact business@evosys.co.in & we shall contact you immediately.

Contact Business@evosys.co.in
I A Feher
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I A Feher,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 11:31:36 PM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
Clarity

Clarity and simplicity in messaging is critical to growing Salesforce. G«ˇCustomer CompanyG«÷ makes perfect sense. Focusing on growing a Customer For Life is the next logical iteration that can resonate with clients. All businesses want a one-time buyer to become a customer for life.

Disclosure: I work with customerforlife.com, a Salesforce Cloud Alliance Partner
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2013 | 11:09:18 PM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
I think this focus makes sense. Salesforce's pitch on "social business" gave people a lot to ponder, but then what? What action do I take? A customer focus is still a lot easier to say than do, but it's at least the right place to look.
John Foley
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John Foley,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 7:39:05 PM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
Here's my problem with grand strategies to improve the customer experience -- technology is 90% of the solution but only 10% of the problem. Too often, the airlines, hotels, rental car companies, retailers, etc., that I deal with have decent websites and Facebook pages, online reservation systems and call centers, iPhone apps, and so on. Their targeted emails get thru to me every time with hard-to-resist offers. But it's the people, processes, and policies that fall short and cause too many of those companies to lose my loyalty. Tech implementations must be aligned with well-conceived and well-executed business processes.
ChrisvLS
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ChrisvLS,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/27/2013 | 6:28:28 PM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
Great piece Doug.

It's interesting that the Customer Company positioning seems aimed at competing with Oracle's Customer Experience (CX), powered by the RightNow acquisition. If these two are going to square off competing for the platform to power all customer contacts (sales, marketing, service), Salesforce is going to need more marketing product and Oracle more mobile and social product. Adobe positioned this way for a while with its Customer Experience Management platform (disclosure, that was my old job).

I do think that Salesforce's mobile platform opens up big new opportunities. With mobile app stores and salesforce's open integration, individual salespeople can now buy apps that solve their problems (as opposed to the problems of sales managers, who are the buyers of CRM today).

Dsiclosure -- this is my current job: We're building a great mobile app for salespeople using Salesforce at http://selligy.com.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2013 | 4:14:03 PM
re: Salesforce.com's New Message: It's The Customer, Stupid
Salesforce shared a video at the event yesterday that was very reminiscent of an old Siebel TV ad that ran in that company's hey day. The SF ad started with nostalgic images of a "back in 10 minutes" sign, an old fashioned phone with the "hold" button blinking, a "ring for service" bell on a dusty counter. Both ads evoke the same sort of feeling, though as I recall, Siebel was calling for old-fashioned customer appreciation. Somebody please find a link to that old Siebel ad! I looked on YouTube but couldn't find it.

I really got a back-to-basics feel from the "become a customer company" event. Yes, there are the latest-tech twists including social, mobile, cloud, etc. but when Michael Slaby of the Obama America campaign talked about "not getting distracted by shiny new things" and "focusing only on what will improve your business," my thought was that it seems as though Benioff is taking that advice with the new tag line.


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