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What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
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raagatha
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raagatha,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2013 | 4:02:38 AM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
Nice article
acampoe
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acampoe,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/20/2013 | 1:20:52 AM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
Is that pork or turkey? I believe it was pork, served by a congressman/woman near the so called Library of Congress. Upss, maybe it was that the FCC and the other folks of that committee reserved a reading room there because it was so crowded at their own halls. It's just like Macondo's place in the bestseller book by Nobel Price Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Wake up US!
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/6/2013 | 2:47:57 AM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
What an unlocked phone or device means for me - that that's a device that I need to treat differently since it's no longer a trusted device when it comes to riding on my network.

With regards to the actual practice, carriers are trying to protect the revenue streams by not allowing devices to be unlocked. Recall from the article that the device is sold at a loss and the loss is made up over the life of the contract - meanwhile, the device's usage (i.e. the service provided by the carrier) is also a revenue stream. Consider that if you unlock a phone and move to a different carrier, the original carrier has now lost money on the device and the recurring revenue created by the contract goes away as well.

As to how the Library of Congress can take the action that they did in order to make this the law of the land, I would direct you to look at: USC Title 17 Circular 92 Chapter 121 Section 1201.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
sloan1919
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sloan1919,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 7:40:07 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
The articles leaves out an important fact, most companies charge a fee if you break the contract. I assume this fee is related to the amount of the device subsidy. This is important because the article paints the picture that the carrier's sole interest during the contract is to avoid paying for a phone for the competitor. This is not the case. The carrier is simply attempting to raise the switching cost to the customer in such a way that the customer resists the temptation of lower prices and better service from a competitor. This ultimately has the effect of reducing competition. One of the most effective ways of reducing competition is through legislation which apparently the carriers where successful in lobbying for in 2012.
Nick4114
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Nick4114,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 7:38:54 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
Did you read the article all the way through? This is about *off-contract* phones where you either paid full price or you have already completed your 2 year commitment. As far as I'm concerned, you should be able to unlock on-contract phones as well. If you end your contract early, carriers have huge penalty fees that recoup the costs of the subsidized phone.
Nick4114
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Nick4114,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 7:36:32 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
You are right, but there is crossover. Two of the big 4 telecom providers use CDMA and two use GSM. I don't know all the deets with 4g, LTE, 3g, and voice, but there is plenty of overlap.
jvoda631
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jvoda631,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 7:23:43 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
Unless I'm mistaken, aren't the frequencies used by the wireless providers different, such that the antennaeG«÷s in the devices must be customized to the provider, such that a device sold by one provider couldn't work on another company's network, anyway? As US firms move to LTE the differences may be less, but as long as the providers own their own frequencies (rather than them all sharing them all) or technology advances to antennas can work on ANY frequency, devices will always be limited to specific bandwidths.
ilocano
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ilocano,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 7:23:10 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
The bottom line is that if you've paid for the phone (contract ends), you should be able to use that phone with other carriers. Otherwise, call it "Rent". I am so sick of corporate greed who is always finding ways to make money from average consumers. Cell phone carriers has the money exert influence in the white house so they can find loopholes to screw everyone else. How much is enough for these guys? They make hundreds per month from their customers already and that's not enough? It's already ludicrous that they introduced that concept of charging for data transfer but because nobody stood up or said anything, now most of them are charging data transfer. Let's all stick together and keep these greedy corporate in check.
NJ Mike
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NJ Mike,
User Rank: Strategist
3/5/2013 | 6:38:27 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
"First, some backstory: Until January 26 of this year, it was legal for device owners to unlock their phones. It was legal thanks to an exemption made by the Library of Congress in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. For whatever reason, the Library of Congress changed the exemption in October 2012 and the new locking rule went into effect two months ago." - since when did the Library of Congress get involved in the law-making business?
joesephus
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joesephus,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2013 | 5:44:11 PM
re: What Unlocked Phones Mean For Businesses
The key phrase in this article is that FOR WHATEVER REASON THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CHANGED THE LAW. That action by an unelected body to arbitrarily change the law needs to be looked at,as to why and for what reason were they prompted to do this,and where do they get the right to do these things. I suggest we follow the money to see who would benefit by such actions. It seems to me only the telecom people and maybe someone in the Library of Congress.
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