Comments
Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
lgarey@techweb.com
50%
50%
lgarey@techweb.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 3:30:59 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
Clicking through channels last night I landed on the current iteration of Sherlock Holmes, sitting in a bathroom, talking to Lucy Liu as he clicked open his Win 8 tablet with the keyboard cover and very pointedly interacted with his tiles. Really inspired product placement. Lorna Garey, IW Reports
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/8/2013 | 3:43:57 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
Depending on who you ask, the day of the week, and who knows what other variables, a Windows 8 device like Dell's XPS 12 might be called a tablet, ultrabook, touch PC, convertible, hybrid, transformer -- you get the idea. (Dell calls it a "Convertible Touch Screen UltrabookGäó."

That sums it up nicely! This is what happens when you get too many marketing cooks in a room.

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
BubbaIT
50%
50%
BubbaIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 5:43:30 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
So - let me get this straight...

The strength - at least it's been that in the past - of the PC marketplace, its diversity and range of different and yet compatible products - is now a huge weakness.

Maybe we should be more careful about asking for what we may ultimately get...

For the record, I've been using Windows 8 since the release of the Developer Preview 16 months ago. I've upgraded every device in my home to Windows 8 Pro. Some of them are touch-screen-enabled, most aren't. My wife is not a computer professional, and yet she manages to successfully use Windows 8 on three different devices. I frankly think there's too much hand-wringing amongst the professional journalism set about something that will sort itself out with time.

Windows Blue is going to be out in a few months, bringing with it further refinements to the UI and other aspects of Windows 8. How about we all stop whining about perceived shortcomings of the present product and wait to see what develops?
Tronist
50%
50%
Tronist,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 5:45:43 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
I had no problem deciding which to buy. I bought 2 laptops with Windows 7.
midmachine
50%
50%
midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
3/8/2013 | 6:09:10 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
Really? You take some time before making a purchase to do some research and then go to the stores (since this is a large investment) and try out the different products that are out there to see which best suits your habits and your needs. NO! Better to tie yourself in with Apple because they make life "so much easier" because they offer only two products....come on! That is what always made the Wintel world have a leg up as far as I am concerned - choice and flexibility (not to mention ease of service/customization). I don't need Big Brother Apple holding me back.
Emag
50%
50%
Emag,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 6:26:48 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
I like Tronist had no problem:
Surface - Windows 8 PRO
Laptop - Windows 7
jbamp
50%
50%
jbamp,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 7:33:12 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
What's up with Information Week's obvious bias against all things Windows 8? If you keep publishing these articles that are in clear contrast with IT professionals' findings, only your reputation suffers.
robzilla
50%
50%
robzilla,
User Rank: Strategist
3/8/2013 | 7:52:29 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
I agree with the article in that Windows 8 hardware choices are a joke. I do not agree that Apple's one size fits all works but I see it being easier for people who are not tech oriented.

First off selling a traditional laptop on windows 8 should simply not be allowed. Manufacturers had time and knew what was coming and are trying to sell old stock as new. Win 8 needs a touch screen not to work but to take advantage of its full feature set. Selling any product without a touchscreen is a dis service to MS and the OS. Windows 8 changes everything like vista changed hardware requirements win 8 does too. I tried the pre release versions on my laptop and although it worked fine it was not intuitive and made life more complecated rather than easier. It felt like a step back not forward. I think the unity desktop in Ubuntu Linux is a much better solution for both touch and non touch devices. MS should have copied unity instead of their tile system IMHO.

It is going to take a year or two before manufacturers really catch up and sell all the old stock and come up with better new touch based solutions. Windows is still a great choice but this was not a well coordinated or well planned release. I think that is why MS tried to come out with their own bramd tomshow others what it should look like.

For the tablet market I am sorry but I feel at the moment Win 8 is a pretty big failure for several reasons. Price, who wants to pay $1000 for a tablet? I don't care what it can do that is too much money. Since Apple and Android have some pretty nice choices at half that cost it is a hard sell for $1000 just to have enterprize features and ms office suite compatibility.

I think if they had 3 models. A 7 inch with rt at $249 with 32 gb storage and a good cpu and ram. A 10 inch with rt at $349 and a 10 inch at $449 with full win 8 and all the goodies all with more cpu, ram and storage than competing tablets not factoring the os all with microsoft branding and one desktop all in one touch screen with a quad core and 6 gb ram high def ips for $700 24 inch screen with MS name they would have made a fortune and shown hardware makers what to copy. Laptops are dead, get rid of them. Have a nice tablet with a doc or all in one desktop with touchscreen and you could have recolutionized the market and blown user expectations.

As it is now there is a confusing mix of old hardware that is not optimally designed for win 8. It will make early adopters feel let down. Cohesion and vision with direction are good. Once you lay down a cohesive vision and say this is the base standard with this software then you let the OEMS add more choice in the mix. This is how Microsoft could have used its manufacturing diversity as a strength and not a weakness and improved customer experience at the same time.

Give the OEMS a year and I think things will work themselves out. Until then I will be using my awesome windows 7 laptop with keyboard and touchpad and my inexpensive nexus 7. Times are tough and not many people have the money to drop on a tablet that really does not offer thatmuch aadvantage and could still be dropped and game over. Portable devices just should not cost so much. The trend is pricing lower not higher!

All my opinion and not to be taken seriously because I am no expert.

R
wht
50%
50%
wht,
User Rank: Strategist
3/8/2013 | 8:07:17 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
I bought a laptop running Win 8 Pro and upgraded a PC to Win 8 Pro. No touch screens. At work I use Win 7 Pro, Win 8 Pro desktops, and Win 8 ultrabooks with touch screen. Win 8 has been a great upgrade. Faster boot, shutdown, and application processing, Tronist may regret staying behind on Win 7 instead of learning how to use Win 8.
pbuhr537
50%
50%
pbuhr537,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/8/2013 | 8:26:31 PM
re: Windows 8 Device Choices Baffle Buyers
Seems like Android has done OK with a lot of flavors. Not sure the author's premise has any validity.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 18, 2014
Enterprise social network success starts and ends with integration. Here's how to finally make collaboration click.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.