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Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
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Paul Gorski
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Paul Gorski,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 7:35:33 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
I suppose if you don't mind Gmail and Google docs, you could be OK with a Chromebook, but I'm not a big fan of Gmail nor Google docs. I too work with sites that don't play well with Chrome, and Chrome doesn't play well with single-sign on. If I wanted a full-featured lightweight OS, I'd simply go with Lubuntu, and you can pretty much run that on anything these days.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/11/2013 | 7:58:15 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
What will you do with the old Mac, now, I wonder? My personal Macbook is about to hit its freshness date and I have come to the conclusion there is nothing I need it for anymore, compared to my tablet.

Follow up question: Did this experiment make you more or less fond of iPad, by comparison?

Laurianne McLaughlin
InformationWeek
David Berlind
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David Berlind,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 8:46:01 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Larry, totally agree when you're talking about the Pixel. This is the part that I think Google got wrong was building a super expensive Chromebook. The question is whether you'd reconsider if the reverse were true... the Chromebook being significantly less expensive than a Windows notebook. I have a Chromebook here. I also have a Chromebox. I could definitely envision a company committing itself to an all-Google infrastructure (mail, apps, etc.) and equipping its employees thusly (even on the smartphone front). But I agree that you're going to run into problems when this isn't the case. As journalists (for example), we must investigate other content that's on the Web. Whether it's with my Chromebook, my Chromebox, or Chrome running on my Android phone, a site with Flash based content (and no Flash alternative) will stop you dead in your tracks.. forcing you to crack open something a little more robust.
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
3/11/2013 | 10:46:26 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Although I still use tablets for email, status updates and news feed checks (primarily while on an exercise bike :), I see the Chromebook replacing more of my tablet use. While I have forced tablets into being a work machine by using BT keyboards and various writing/content creation apps, this type of work is a much better fit on Chrome.
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
3/11/2013 | 10:55:34 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Re: Chrome vs. notebook. The big difference is convenience, maintenance and security. Chrome kills a thick OS on all three fronts (I assume you saw the recent Pwnium challenge: http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/... ). Regarding sites not playing nice with Chrome, that's often due to sloppy coding and can be fixed by faking the User Agent string. There are several extensions that do this and make things like Skydrive work better. To really appreciate Chrome, you need to shed some old, PC-bred habits and think about doing things in new ways. In that sense, it's very similar to adopting a tablet (as per Laurie's comment). I didn't really appreciate the 'app lifestyle' until I lived off an iPad at Interop for a week a couple years ago. Sometimes, different is really just different, not inferior.

Regarding the Pixel: I initially bought into the tech conventional wisdom that this was a crazy move by Google, but now I don't agree. It's clearly targeted at the developer and evangelist community and as such, will serve as a catalyst for an onslaught of new apps and services. Google I/O should be _very_ interesting (too bad it's the week after Interop since I wouldn't mind seeing what they roll out).
kmarko
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kmarko,
User Rank: Strategist
3/11/2013 | 10:56:02 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Re: Chrome vs. notebook. The big difference is convenience, maintenance and security. Chrome kills a thick OS on all three fronts (I assume you saw the recent Pwnium challenge: http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/... ). Regarding sites not playing nice with Chrome, that's often due to sloppy coding and can be fixed by faking the User Agent string. There are several extensions that do this and make things like Skydrive work better. To really appreciate Chrome, you need to shed some old, PC-bred habits and think about doing things in new ways. In that sense, it's very similar to adopting a tablet (as per Laurie's comment). I didn't really appreciate the 'app lifestyle' until I lived off an iPad at Interop for a week a couple years ago. Sometimes, different is really just different, not inferior.

Regarding the Pixel: I initially bought into the tech conventional wisdom that this was a crazy move by Google, but now I don't agree. It's clearly targeted at the developer and evangelist community and as such, will serve as a catalyst for an onslaught of new apps and services. Google I/O should be _very_ interesting (too bad it's the week after Interop since I wouldn't mind seeing what they roll out).
George Ou
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George Ou,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2013 | 10:58:46 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
I can't see myself sending my print data to some "cloud" Internet based server only to have it send the print job back to either a dedicated machine that hooks up to the printer. I'll stick with my old school HP Jet Direct protocol thank you.
FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2013 | 4:51:35 AM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Kurt, what was the battery life like? Did you test that at all? I wonder whether its low client processing footprint helps in that regard. But like Larry and David, I also run into some sites that don't behave well in Chrome.
CAC1031
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CAC1031,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2013 | 11:14:01 AM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
"The think about Chromebook that I still don't get is that there's nothing it does that I can't do on my less-expensive Windows notebook that does a whole lot more."

I make this point continually: Many people (who've tried it) PREFER Chrome OS over Windows or Mac because it is hassle-free--no clunky software installations, no ant-virus, no attention to updates or maintenance, and there is barely a need to troubleshoot issues. When it does occasionally crash, it repairs itself within seconds with no data loss. So that is why some of us who can live in the cloud would buy a Chromebook over an identically priced Windows laptop.

Now as to why one might prefer the PIxel--well, those with the cash may be willing to pay a premium for the stellar screen, the terrific audio and mike set up and the other added details that make it a luxury device. Same as there are those who will pay for high-end Windows or Macs that do the same as cheaper ones, but in a nicer way.
jimbo0117
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jimbo0117,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2013 | 3:44:39 PM
re: Chromebook Pixel: My First Week Living In Cloud
Sorry dude, but you jumped the shark with "At least for me, no device is worth much when I'm offline, and network access is never a problem today". Really? I can't tell you the number of times I've needed to accomplish work on a flight where no Wi-Fi is available. Same thing for some airports. I'm a software developer, and a device where I can only be productive when I'm online is nearly worthless to me.
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