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3 Reasons Your Top IT Pros Leave
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EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2013 | 1:49:46 PM
re: 3 Reasons Your Top IT Pros Leave
Sorry, I didn't check back very soon to see your reply to mine. While I agree that the concept was a good one, my thoughts would be to ask if the Manager asked the Engineer to help him put together the RIGHT project to showcase Linux ? It could be that the planning was done in isolation (something that I see happen frequently) and that the project might not have been one that the Engineer felt would lead to a success for Linux (there are some areas where Windows is more appropriate and different areas where Linux can definitely shine). Important to make sure that the Engineer is part of the planning, if he is going to be the one expected to buy in to the showcasing project.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2013 | 4:09:57 AM
re: 3 Reasons Your Top IT Pros Leave
I would have to agree with your point here, but the difficulty becomes one where the middle managers are given the task of both making sure that the lower levels on the totem pole get the job done as well as keeping them involved and engaged.

Anecdotal case in point - in an organization that I'm familiar with, one of the Level II engineers was a big fan of Linux. His manager knew this, but at the same time there was a reluctance by the upper echelons in the IT division to move away from the standard Windows/Office deployment. The manager, trying to balance out the wants of the engineer, the needs of the organization and quell the fears of upper management set up a project with a very specific set of guidelines and goals for the engineer to build out a test Linux environment to demonstrate how it would possibly be used to replace Windows in the enterprise. If it could be demonstrated that there would be little learning curve on the part of the standard knowledge worker and that administration costs would not go up, this idea could have saved the organization a bucket of money on licensing costs annually - 6 figures worth of savings per year would have been a pretty good sized feather in the cap. Upon assigning the project and discussing the goals, the engineer decides that the manager is all wrong and essentially short circuits the project - all of the planning on the project went up in smoke.

One of the big things in that situation was about communication and trying to give someone a project that they would really be able to sink their teeth into, but the X-factor became the employee's reluctance to work within the guidelines.

It's a huge balancing act when you start trying to give people things to do that they would enjoy working on - but that requires communication, not exactly the average technical staffer's forte. In today's environment, money's in short supply in a lot of organizations (whether for salaries, benefits or training/learning opportunities) and the stress levels are up because of the drive to do more with less.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/21/2013 | 2:38:16 PM
re: 3 Reasons Your Top IT Pros Leave
Sometimes the move doesn't even have to be UP in the sense of a Management move. Sometimes it is an opportunity to contribute in a different way than they have before as they obtain a broader knowledge of the company, how to contribute to projects and ask the right questions, etc... Talking with employees to find out what they would like to be doing may shed light onto what will energize them to contribute to the overall success of the company.
cburns007
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cburns007,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2013 | 4:27:04 PM
re: 3 Reasons Your Top IT Pros Leave
Damn I hope they didn't pay you for this article. Money, opportunity, workload? Really? That's the best you`can do?

How about CIO's that are so stupid they can't find the water cooler?
How about the financial squeeze on IT departments as the company says IT is too expensive yet all the execs want an IPad, iPhone, Mac etc ..and drive up IT costs.
How about clueless business unit owners that blame IT but can't write a comprehensive business plan outlining what they need from IT to be successful?

This are just a few off the top of my head without even trying.

Try again Kevin, you can do better!


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